dead loss


Also found in: Idioms.
Related to dead loss: Deadweight loss

dead loss

n
1. informal a person, thing, or situation that is completely useless or unprofitable
2. a complete loss for which no compensation is received
Translations

dead loss

n (fam) to be a dead loss (person, thing) → non valere niente
References in classic literature ?
The goodly steed and the rich armour, equal to the full profit of my adventure with our Kirjath Jairam of Leicester there is a dead loss too ay, a loss which swallows up the gains of a week; ay, of the space between two Sabaoths and yet it may end better than I now think, for 'tis a good youth.
Crisparkle, at a dead loss for anything else to say.
Consequently the advertisement was withdrawn at a dead loss - for as to sherry, my poor dear mother's own sherry was in the market then - and ten years afterwards, the caul was put up in a raffle down in our part of the country, to fifty members at half-a-crown a head, the winner to spend five shillings.
And Docherty - who left the Scotland job to join Manchester United in 1972 - believes the ex-Yorkshire County Cricket Club supremo has been a dead loss.
UNTIL the miracles started, 13-year-old Jimmy was called an ornament, a useless article and a dead loss by his Mam and Nan.
In a competition which has been a dead loss for United in recent seasons, the draw saw the Magpies handed a thirdround trip to Watford early in 2016.
He said: "It's just not worth running a post office any more, it's a dead loss.
Neville wasn't the only dead loss of the France v Ecuador game.
But look at the bigger picture, your husband is a dead loss.
The good weather this summer has helped boost confidence, particularly since last year, which was a dead loss.
A dead loss on two outings this term, the 16-1 shot staved off a late assault by Prussian for the pounds 60,000 prize.
If you don't fall in love with them [the Beatles]," she wrote in a review of A Hard Day's Night for the New Republic (October 10, 1964), "the film seems a dead loss, but not doing so requires indifference to an astonishing charm.