dead-heading

dead-heading

A technique of removing old flowers once they start to fade. This prevents them looking unsightly and encourages the plant to produce further flushes of flowers.
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By midsummer, the first flush is usually coming to an end, so you'll need to tidy up shrub and bush varieties by dead-heading and removing clusters of faded flowers.
Dead-heading is a regular task from now to the end of the season and there are good reasons why you should do it.
In summer they will need dead-heading to prolong flowering and stems can be cut in late autumn.
Dead-heading is a gardening term that refers to the removal of faded flowers after they have bloomed.
Less watering, no dead-heading, long-lasting, they're perfect.
Dead-heading bedding and perennials is essential to allow new growth and new flowers to bloom.
The garden will be at its most colourful in the next few weeks and the gardeners will be busy cutting back, dead-heading and, of course, weeding.
Prune old-fashioned roses and climbers after flowering, and when dead-heading cut the stem off just above a healthy leaf
Alongside this regular task is the other routine of dead-heading - a boring but very necessary task to ensure the success of many summer bedding plants.
Regular dead-heading will encourage further flushes or just give it a hard trim after the first flush of flowers to keep the plants tidy.
They flower from mid-summer until autumn and benefit from regular dead-heading.