deal in


Also found in: Legal, Idioms.

deal 1

 (dēl)
v. dealt (dĕlt), deal·ing, deals
v.tr.
1. To give out in shares or portions; apportion: a critic who deals out as much praise as blame. See Synonyms at distribute.
2. Games
a. To distribute (playing cards) among players.
b. To give (a specific card) to a player while so distributing.
3. To sell: deal prescriptions; deal cocaine.
4. To administer; deliver: dealt him a blow to the stomach.
v.intr.
1. To be occupied or concerned: a book that deals with the Middle Ages.
2. To behave in a specified way toward another or others; have transactions: deal honestly with competitors.
3. To take action with respect to someone or something: The committee will deal with this complaint.
4. Informal To cope: I can't deal with all of this arguing!
5. To do business; trade: dealing in diamonds.
6. Games To distribute playing cards.
7. Slang To buy and sell drugs, especially illegally.
8. Baseball To throw a pitch.
n.
1. The act or a round of apportioning or distributing.
2. Games
a. Distribution of playing cards.
b. The cards so distributed; a hand.
c. The right or turn of a player to distribute the cards.
d. The playing of one hand.
3. An indefinite quantity, extent, or degree: has a great deal of experience.
4.
a. An agreement, especially one that is mutually beneficial. See Synonyms at agreement.
b. A business transaction: struck a deal to buy a car dealership.
c. A legal contract: signed a deal to play for a new team.
5. Informal A sale favorable especially to the buyer; a bargain.
6. Informal Treatment received: a raw deal; a fair deal.
7. Informal The situation or background information regarding something: What's the deal with the new teacher?
Phrasal Verbs:
deal in
1. To include (someone) in a card game by dealing cards to that person.
2. To include (someone) in an enterprise or undertaking.
deal out
1. To exclude (someone) from a card game by not giving cards to that person.
2. To exclude (someone) from an enterprise or undertaking.

[Middle English delen, from Old English dǣlan, to divide, share; see dail- in Indo-European roots.]

deal 2

 (dēl)
n.
1.
a. A fir or pine board cut to standard dimensions.
b. Such boards or planks considered as a group.
2. Fir or pine wood.

[Middle English dele, from Middle Dutch and Middle Low German dele, plank.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

deal

verb
1. To give out in portions or shares.Also used with out:
Slang: divvy.
2. To offer for sale.Also used with in:
3. To engage in the illicit sale of (narcotics):
Slang: push.
4. To mete out by means of some action:
phrasal verb
deal with
1. To be occupied or concerned with:
2. To behave in a specified way toward:
noun
1. An indefinite amount or extent:
Informal: lot.
2. An act or state of agreeing between parties regarding a course of action:
3. An agreement, especially one involving a sale or exchange:
4. Informal. Something offered or bought at a low price:
Informal: buy.
Slang: steal.
Translations

w>deal in

vi +prep obj (Comm) goods, stolen property, pornographyhandeln mit; this is an organization dealing in terrordiese Organisation hat sich dem Terror verschrieben; we deal only in factswir beschränken uns auf die Tatsachen
vt sep (Cards) playerKarten geben (+dat)
References in classic literature ?
To deal in person is good, when a man's face breedeth regard, as commonly with inferiors; or in tender cases, where a man's eye, upon the countenance of him with whom he speaketh, may give him a direction how far to go; and generally, where a man will reserve to himself liberty, either to disavow or to expound.
Ryde insisted strongly on the doctrines of the Reformation, visited his flock a great deal in their own homes, and was severe in rebuking the aberrations of the flesh--put a stop, indeed, to the Christmas rounds of the church singers, as promoting drunkenness and too light a handling of sacred things.
There was a delightful history of Ohio, stuffed with tales of the pioneer times, which was a good deal in the hands of us boys; and there was a book of Western Adventure, full of Indian fights and captivities, which we wore to pieces.