death cap


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death cap

or death·cap (dĕth′kăp′)
n.
A poisonous, usually white mushroom (Amanita phalloides) having a prominent cup-shaped base. Also called death cup.

death cap

or

death angel

n
(Biology) a poisonous woodland saprotrophic basidiomycetous fungus, Amanita phalloides, differing from the edible mushroom (Agaricus) only in its white gills (pinkish-brown in Agaricus) and the presence of a volva. See also amanita
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.death cap - extremely poisonous usually white fungus with a prominent cup-shaped basedeath cap - extremely poisonous usually white fungus with a prominent cup-shaped base; differs from edible Agaricus only in its white gills
agaric - a saprophytic fungus of the order Agaricales having an umbrellalike cap with gills on the underside
Amanita, genus Amanita - genus of widely distributed agarics that have white spores and are poisonous with few exceptions
References in periodicals archive ?
Mushroom gathering doesn't come without its risks however, and digesting a toxic death cap mushroom (amanita phalloides) can be fatal.
Amanitin is a bicyclic peptide naturally occurring in the green Death Cap mushroom and it potently inhibits the biosynthesis of RNA, a mechanism critical for the survival of cells.
Chris serves up a rogue risotto in the Diner and, because the dodgy dish contains death cap mushrooms, both Alf Stewart (above) and Leah collapse and pass out.
The Death Cap is the most poisonous variety of what?
Some gourmet species look very similar to lethal specimens like the Death Cap.
Australia: Woman reported to be visiting Australia from China has died after eating a toxic Death Cap mushroom -- the third such fatality in the southern nation this year.
Washington, Apr 3 ( ANI ): Researchers have come up with a method for destroying cancer cells using death cap mushroom (Amanita phalloides) toxin, without harming the body.
The most dangerous mushrooms and toadstools are the aptly named death cap, which grows near the base of oak trees; fly agaric, known for its distinctive bright-red cap with raised white spots; and the dramatically named destroying angel, which is fortunately quite rare.
The Death Cap and Destroying Angel are in our midst.
But none the less, the Death Cap is ubiquitous and A.