debility


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de·bil·i·ty

 (dĭ-bĭl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. de·bil·i·ties
The state of being weak or feeble; infirmity.

[Middle English debilite, from Old French, from Latin dēbilitās, from dēbilis, weak; see bel- in Indo-European roots.]

debility

(dɪˈbɪlɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
weakness or infirmity

de•bil•i•ty

(dɪˈbɪl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a weakened or enfeebled state; weakness.
2. a handicap or disability.
[1425–75; late Middle English debylite < Middle French debilite < Latin dēbilitās=dēbil(is) weak + -itās -ity]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.debility - the state of being weak in health or body (especially from old age)
unfitness, softness - poor physical condition; being out of shape or out of condition (as from a life of ease and luxury)
asthenia, astheny - an abnormal loss of strength
cachexia, cachexy, wasting - any general reduction in vitality and strength of body and mind resulting from a debilitating chronic disease

debility

noun weakness, exhaustion, frailty, incapacity, infirmity, feebleness, faintness, decrepitude, enervation, enfeeblement, sickliness Anxiety or general debility can play a part in allergies.

debility

noun
Translations
وَهْن، ضَعْف
ochablostslabostvyčerpanost
svækkelsesvaghed
veiklun
takatsizlikzayıflık

debility

[dɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] Ndebilidad f

debility

[dɪˈbɪlɪti] n [patient] (= infirmity) → extrême faiblesse f

debility

nSchwäche f

debility

[dɪˈbɪlɪtɪ] n (frm) → debilitazione f

debilitate

(diˈbiliteit) verb
to make weak.
deˈbility noun
bodily weakness. Despite his debility, he leads a normal life.

de·bil·i·ty

n. debilidad; atonía.
References in classic literature ?
After allowing a moment of stillness to enforce his discipline, the voice of the singer was heard, in low, murmuring syllables, gradually stealing on the ear, until it filled the narrow vault with sounds rendered trebly thrilling by the feeble and tremulous utterance produced by his debility.
It is true that the science of medicine, as it now exists, contains few things whose utility is very remarkable: but without any wish to depreciate it, I am confident that there is no one, even among those whose profession it is, who does not admit that all at present known in it is almost nothing in comparison of what remains to be discovered; and that we could free ourselves from an infinity of maladies of body as well as of mind, and perhaps also even from the debility of age, if we had sufficiently ample knowledge of their causes, and of all the remedies provided for us by nature.
He was small, as I have said; I was struck besides with the shocking expression of his face, with his remarkable combination of great muscular activity and great apparent debility of constitution, and--last but not least--with the odd, subjective disturbance caused by his neighbourhood.
But Rochefort, who had passed five years in prison, had become old in the lapse of a few years; the dark locks of this estimable friend of the defunct Cardinal Richelieu were now white; the deep bronze of his complexion had been succeeded by a mortal pallor which betokened debility.
The next morning, in spite of our debility and the agony of hunger under which we were now suffering, though neither of us confessed to the fact, we struggled along our dismal and still difficult and dangerous path, cheered by the hope of soon catching a glimpse of the valley before us, and towards evening the voice of a cataract which had for some time sounded like a low deep bass to the music of the smaller waterfalls, broke upon our ears in still louder tones, and assured us that we were approaching its vicinity.
There was not only the debility of recent illness to assist: there was also, as she now learnt, nerves much affected, spirits much depressed to calm and raise, and her own imagination added that there must be a mind to be properly guided.
A languid cousin with a moustache in a state of extreme debility now observes from his couch that man told him ya'as'dy that Tulkinghorn had gone down t' that iron place t' give legal 'pinion
His years were too heavy upon him, the debility of disease and the lethargy and torpor of the silence and the cold were too profound.
A sinking, a depression, a lowness, a lassitude, a debility.
49 East -- street, suffering from debility induced by starvation.
Ah, that that great debility may ever be far from me!
As I was in a state of extreme debility, I resolved to sail directly towards the town, as a place where I could most easily procure nourishment.