decapitalize

decapitalize

(diːˈkæpɪtəˌlaɪz) or

decapitalise

vb (tr)
1. (Economics) to make difficult to have or to take away stock or wealth from
2. to downgrade (a city) from the position of capital city
3. (Grammar) to alter the capitalization, usually from an initial capital letter to a lower-case letter, in a written statement
References in periodicals archive ?
It is precisely these features that undermine the Basel bank capital regulations, which, despite their stated intent to the contrary, have long since become means by which bankers decapitalize their own banks and pass much of the cost of their risk taking onto the taxpayer.
Concentrated on maximizing returns on crop cultivation through the use of family labor, they could not quickly decapitalize when faced with an emergency, while their resources stretched thin to support numerous dependents.
Indeed, one recent monograph has gone so far as to decapitalize the "presidency" in the title of the book: Foley and Owens's Congress and the presidency (1996).
1998: Voucher privatization with investment funds: A sure way to decapitalize industry.
The "fundamentals" of the economy continue to be incompatible with any sustained economic recovery, as the neoliberal economy continues in place, new investments are absent, privatized foreign-owned firms and their local associates continue to decapitalize the economy ($19 billion outflow in 2002) and the power of big capital remains in place, sustaining widening social inequalities.
An insurance plan with full coverage and no categorization results in an equilibrium where banks totally decapitalize (K = 0).
As plan discipline has disappeared, labor and management are de facto in charge of most decisions; in the end-game period after privatization is announced but prior to firm private control, they are led to decapitalize the firms by appropriating or liquidating assets.
In short, the real (though seldom publicly stated) purpose of risk modeling is to use capital regulations to decapitalize banks, and when they go bust, the bankers play dumb and lobby for a bailout.
This and the theft and destruction by the military and its associates of peasant assets, such as credit-union funds, food storage facilities, tree nurseries, tools, machinery and livestock - not to mention the ruthless repression of peasant leaders - continue to severely decapitalize and disrupt peasant agriculture.
As a result, there could be future pressure to decapitalize the Allianz group.
Such practices secretly decapitalize the banks and are of course just another form of looting.
Union actions, clearly, were not the only reason that industrial cities would decapitalize, depopulate, and become poorer in the second half of the 20th century, but they merit inclusion on the list.