decarboxylate

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decarboxylate

(ˌdiːkɑːˈbɒksɪˌleɪt)
vb
to take away a carboxyl group from (an organic compound) or (of an organic compound) to lose a carboxyl group

de•car•box•yl•ate

(ˌdi kɑrˈbɒk səˌleɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
to remove the carboxyl group from (an organic compound).
[1920–25]
de`car•box`yl•a′tion, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.decarboxylate - lose a carboxyl group; "the compound decarboxylated"
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
decarboxylate - remove a carboxyl group from (a chemical compound)
2.decarboxylate - remove a carboxyl group from (a chemical compound)
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
decarboxylate - lose a carboxyl group; "the compound decarboxylated"
References in periodicals archive ?
05 to 10 parts by weight of a salt compound per 100 parts by weight of a diene rubber, the salt compound including a dicarboxylic acid derived from a natural product and an amine of a decarboxylated amino acid derived from a natural product.
Exogenous 1-5-hydroxytryptophan is decarboxylated in neurons of the substantia nigra par compacta and locus coeruleus of the rat.
Putrescine is formed by decarboxylation of ornithine and spermine and spermidine are obtained from putrescine in the presence of decarboxylated S-adenosylmethionine, derived from methionine, thus involving the participation of both amino acids, Arg and methionine.
Once in solution, these groups can become partly decarboxylated through hydrolysis reactions (Yan et al.
After oral droxidopa ingestion, circulating L-DOPS is taken up into cells via the neutral amino acid transporter and decarboxylated enzymatically by L-aromatic-amino-acid decarboxylase, which is abundant in parenchymal cells of organs such as the liver, kidneys, and gut.