decasualization

decasualization

(ˌdɪkæʒjʊlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

decasualisation

n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) US the replacement of casual workers by permanent employees
References in periodicals archive ?
unemployment surveys, 1929 to 1932" (February 1933), synthesizing findings from four surveys on unemployment in a city hard hit by the depression; and "Longshore labor conditions and port decasualization in the United States" (December 1933, with Fred C.
Such a strategy forces the politicians to build themselves a character, legitimizes their decasualization and neglects the political stakes, which are taken out of context, reducing the electoral campaigns to simple fight between personalities.
52) Thus, those aspects of decasualization that led to even marginal increases in the powers and prerogatives of employers were strongly resisted.
Labor's struggles gave what might be called a "proletarian logic" to the labor market, resulting in a sort of decasualization of labor.
Its strategy of decriminalization and decasualization was true to the framers' intent.
On an even more positive note, decasualization began and the system of public loading was terminated without a hitch.
Such a situation, though stabilizing work relations on the water-front for a time, was far from ideal for capital, and the last five decades have been dominated by the counterattack by management, whose object has been to extend the decasualization process still further by eliminating the gang structure and the hiring hall by creating a "standard industrial work force.
It is clear, for example, that the New York--New Jersey area is now threatened by the kind of total decasualization that has already been implemented in the port of Montreal, where the hiring hall has been abolished, dispatch is now determined directly by a computer controlled by management, and gang size has been reduced to no more men than is absolutely necessary for a given job (which compares with minimum gang sizes of six in Vancouver and eighteen in New York).
He cites the (partial) decasualization of janitorial work in some major cities, the (partial) unionization of farm laborers, and the interracial and inter-ethnic trade union work among teamsters, as bearing upon his argument.