decaying


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de·cay

 (dĭ-kā′)
v. de·cayed, de·cay·ing, de·cays
v.intr.
1. Biology To break down into component parts; rot.
2. Physics To disintegrate in a process of radioactive decay or particle decay.
3. Electronics To decrease gradually in magnitude. Used of voltage or current.
4. Aerospace To decrease in orbit. Used of an artificial satellite.
5. To fall into ruin: a civilization that had begun to decay.
6. To decline in health or vigor; waste away.
7. To decline from a state of normality, excellence, or prosperity; deteriorate.
v.tr.
To cause to decay.
n.
1.
a. The destruction or decomposition of organic matter as a result of bacterial or fungal action; rot.
b. Rotted matter.
2. Physics
3. Aerospace The decrease in orbital altitude of an artificial satellite as a result of conditions such as atmospheric drag.
4. A gradual deterioration to an inferior state: tooth decay; urban decay.
5. A falling into ruin.

[Middle English decayen, from Old French decair, from Vulgar Latin *dēcadere : Latin dē-, de- + Latin cadere, to fall; see kad- in Indo-European roots.]

de·cay′er n.
Synonyms: decay, rot, decompose, putrefy, spoil, molder, disintegrate
These verbs refer to the gradual process by which something breaks down or falls apart as a result of natural causes. Decay has wide application but often suggests partial deterioration short of complete destruction: "A decaying dam is an accident waiting to happen" (George Black).
Rot and decompose are closely synonymous with decay, but rot often emphasizes loss of structural integrity while decompose generally stresses breaking down into chemical components: The rotting timbers gave way under the added weight. When grass clippings decompose, they return nutrients to the soil.
Putrefy denotes an advanced stage of organic breakdown that is offensive to the senses: "Large numbers of cows and oxen ... were left to putrefy on mud flats after the floods receded, attracting rats" (John F. Burns).
Spoil usually refers to the process by which perishable substances become unfit for use or consumption: Fish will spoil quickly if not refrigerated.
To molder is to crumble to dust: The shawl had moldered away in the trunk.
Disintegrate refers to the reduction of something to particles, fragments, or constituent elements: The sandstone façade had disintegrated from exposure to wind and rain.

decaying

(dɪˈkeɪɪŋ)
adj
1. rotting as a result of bacterial, fungal, or chemical action; decomposing
2. declining gradually in health, prosperity, excellence, etc

Decaying


degeneration as the result of disuse, malnutrition, etc.
disposition to disintegrate as the result of natural processes. — biodegradable, adj.
the condition of being perishable. — caducous, adj.
the condition of being decayed or carious, especially with regard to teeth.
the destructive process of metabolism in which living matter is turned into waste. — catabolic, adj.
a breaking down; disruption. — cataclasmic, n.
Rare. the process of decay or deterioration. See also change.
degeneration of cells or tissues. — cataplastic, adj.
the stage of decline in organic development.
the degeneration of cells. — cytolytic, adj.
the state or quality of being susceptible to breakdown or decomposition. — degradable, adj.
the belief that the universe is gradually breaking down. See also meliorism.
the condition of being fugacious or transitory; evanescence. — fugacious, adj.
the branch of biology that studies aging and its phenomena. Also gereology. — geratologic, geratologous, adj.
the disintegration or dissolution of organic tissues. — histolytic, adj.
the process of coming apart, especially falling into ruin or decay.
the decomposition of cells by antibodies called lysins.
atrophy or wasting away of the muscles.
the death or decay of body tissue, the result of loss of blood supply or trauma. — necrotic, adj.
depreciation, loss, or diminution in value, quality, etc.
the breakdown of matter or materials under the influence of light. — photolytic, adj.
1. the state or process of rotting or putrefying.
2. rotting or putrefying matter. — putrescent, adj.
a gradual wasting away of the body or of any organ or part of the body.
the wasting of the body, as in consumption. — syntectic, syntectical, adj.
1. the process of emaciation or wasting of the body.
2. the condition of being wasted or in decay, especially as a gradual process. — tabescent, adj.
the state of being affected by tabes, i.e., gradual wasting or decay.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

decaying

adjective
2. declining, dying, failing, abandoned, neglected, waning, languishing, forsaken the problems of decaying inner city areas

decaying

adjective
Showing signs of wear and tear or neglect:
Informal: tacky.
Slang: ratty.
Idioms: all the worse for wear, gone to pot, past cure.
Translations

decaying

[dɪˈkeɪɪŋ] ADJ
1. [food] → podrido, en estado de descomposición; [vegetation] → podrido; [flesh] → en estado de descomposición, en descomposición; [tooth] → cariado; [building] → muy deteriorado, ruinoso; [stone] → que se descompone
2. (fig) [civilization] → decadente, en decadencia

decaying

[dɪˈkeɪɪŋ] adj (vegetation, flesh) → in decomposizione; (teeth) → cariato/a; (building, urban area) → in rovina; (civilization) → in declino
References in classic literature ?
However the flowers might have come there, it was both sad and sweet to observe how Nature adopted to herself this desolate, decaying, gusty, rusty old house of the Pyncheon family; and how the even-returning summer did her best to gladden it with tender beauty, and grew melancholy in the effort.
Nor must we forget the captains of the rusty little schooners that bring firewood from the British provinces; a rough-looking set of tarpaulins, without the alertness of the Yankee aspect, but contributing an item of no slight importance to our decaying trade.
Clare had taken no notice of the child's gradually decaying health and strength, because she was completely absorbed in studying out two or three new forms of disease to which she believed she herself was a victim.
The sun sets on some retired meadow, where no house is visible, with all the glory and splendor that it lavishes on cities, and perchance as it has never set before--where there is but a solitary marsh hawk to have his wings gilded by it, or only a musquash looks out from his cabin, and there is some little black-veined brook in the midst of the marsh, just beginning to meander, winding slowly round a decaying stump.
They tramped gayly along, over decaying logs, through tangled underbrush, among solemn monarchs of the forest, hung from their crowns to the ground with a drooping regalia of grape-vines.
My habitual mood of humiliation, self-doubt, forlorn depression, fell damp on the embers of my decaying ire.
Nearer to the eye, the sullen flow of the tidal river Alde ebbed noiselessly from the muddy banks; and nearer still, lonely and unprosperous by the bleak water-side, lay the lost little port of Slaughden, with its forlorn wharfs and warehouses of decaying wood, and its few scattered coasting-vessels deserted on the oozy river-shore.
Its panelled rooms, discoloured with the dirt and smoke of a hundred years, I dare say; its decaying floors and staircase; the squeaking and scuffling of the old grey rats down in the cellars; and the dirt and rottenness of the place; are things, not of many years ago, in my mind, but of the present instant.
So saying, he gathered together, and brought to a flame, the decaying brands which lay scattered on the ample hearth; took from the larger board a mess of pottage and seethed kid, placed it upon the small table at which he had himself supped, and, without waiting the Jew's thanks, went to the other side of the hall; whether from unwillingness to hold more close communication with the object of his benevolence, or from a wish to draw near to the upper end of the table, seemed uncertain.