deceit


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de·ceit

 (dĭ-sēt′)
n.
1. The act or practice of deceiving; deception.
2. A stratagem; a trick.
3. The quality of being deceitful; falseness.

[Middle English deceite, from Old French, from past participle of deceveir, to deceive; see deceive.]

deceit

(dɪˈsiːt)
n
1. the act or practice of deceiving
2. a statement, act, or device intended to mislead; fraud; trick
3. a tendency to deceive
[C13: from Old French deceite, from deceivre to deceive]

de•ceit

(dɪˈsit)

n.
1. the act or practice of deceiving.
2. a stratagem intended to deceive.
3. the quality of being deceitful; duplicity.
[1225–75; deceite < Old French, n. use of feminine of deceit, past participle of deceivre to deceive]
syn: deceit, guile, duplicity, fraud refer either to practices designed to mislead or to the qualities in a person that prompt such behavior. deceit is intentional concealment or misrepresentation of the truth: Consumers are often victims of deceit. guile is cunning deceit; it suggests subtle but treacherous tactics: He used guile to gain access to the documents. duplicity is doing the opposite of what one says or pretends to do; it suggests hypocrisy or pretense: the duplicity of a friend who does not keep a secret. fraud refers to deceit or trickery by which one may derive benefit at another's expense; it often suggests illegal or dishonest practices: an advertiser convicted of fraud.

Deceit

 of lapwing: a flock of lapwing—Lipton, 1970.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deceit - the quality of being fraudulentdeceit - the quality of being fraudulent  
dishonesty - the quality of being dishonest
2.deceit - a misleading falsehooddeceit - a misleading falsehood    
bill of goods - communication (written or spoken) that persuades someone to accept something untrue or undesirable; "they tried to sell me a bill of goods about a secondhand car"
humbug, snake oil - communication (written or spoken) intended to deceive
falsehood, untruth, falsity - a false statement
half-truth - a partially true statement intended to deceive or mislead
window dressing, facade - a showy misrepresentation intended to conceal something unpleasant
overstatement, exaggeration, magnification - making to seem more important than it really is
snow job - a long and elaborate misrepresentation
dissembling, feigning, pretense, pretence - pretending with intention to deceive
subterfuge, blind - something intended to misrepresent the true nature of an activity; "he wasn't sick--it was just a subterfuge"; "the holding company was just a blind"
hanky panky, hocus-pocus, jiggery-pokery, skulduggery, skullduggery, slickness, trickery - verbal misrepresentation intended to take advantage of you in some way
duplicity, fraudulence - a fraudulent or duplicitous representation
equivocation, evasion - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth
3.deceit - the act of deceiving
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts
fakery - the act of faking (or the product of faking)
indirection - deceitful action that is not straightforward; "he could see through the indirections of diplomats"
chicanery, wile, shenanigan, trickery, guile, chicane - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
double-dealing, duplicity - acting in bad faith; deception by pretending to entertain one set of intentions while acting under the influence of another
cheating, cheat - a deception for profit to yourself
head game, illusion, delusion - the act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas
pretending, pretense, feigning, simulation, pretence - the act of giving a false appearance; "his conformity was only pretending"
imposture, impersonation - pretending to be another person
obscurantism - a deliberate act intended to make something obscure
four flush, bluff - the act of bluffing in poker; deception by a false show of confidence in the strength of your cards
take-in - the act of taking in as by fooling or cheating or swindling someone

deceit

deceit

noun
The act or practice of deceiving:
Translations
خُدْعَه، خِداع
podvod
bedrageri
harhautushuijaushuiputuspetospetosyritys
svik
apgaulingumasklastingailinkęs meluotimelagingaimelagingumas
krāpšanamaldināšana
prevara

deceit

[dɪˈsiːt] N (= misleading) → engaño m; (= fraud) → fraude m; (= deceitfulness) → falsedad f
he was involved in a web of lies and deceitestaba metido en una maraña de mentiras y engaños
they won the voters over by deceitconquistaron a los votantes engañándolos or mediante engaños

deceit

[dɪˈsiːt] n (= deception) → tromperie f
I acquired the habit of deceit, of lying
BUT Je pris l'habitude de tromper, de mentir.

deceit

nBetrug m no pl, → Täuschung f; these unending deceitsdiese endlosen Täuschungsmanöver; a character full of deceitein durch und durch falscher Charakter

deceit

[dɪˈsiːt] n (quality) → disonestà; (action) → inganno, truffa

deceit

(diˈsiːt) noun
(an act of) deceiving. She was too honest to be capable of deceit.
deˈceitful adjective
deceiving or insincere. She's such a deceitful child!
deˈceitfully adverb
deˈceitfulness noun

deceit is spelt with -ei-.
References in classic literature ?
Where pride and stupidity unite there can be no dissimulation worthy notice, and Miss Vernon shall be consigned to unrelenting contempt; but by all that I can gather Lady Susan possesses a degree of captivating deceit which it must be pleasing to witness and detect.
But ordinary expense, ought to be limited by a man's estate; and governed with such regard, as it be within his compass; and not subject to deceit and abuse of servants; and ordered to the best show, that the bills may be less than the estimation abroad.
To say the truth, in discovering the deceit of others, it matters much that our own art be wound up, if I may use the expression, in the same key with theirs: for very artful men sometimes miscarry by fancying others wiser, or, in other words, greater knaves, than they really are.
This will, moreover, afford a reason why the wiser man, as is often seen, is the bubble of the weaker, and why many simple and innocent characters are so generally misunderstood and misrepresented; but what is most material, this will account for the deceit which Sophia put on her politic aunt.
Except deceit and lying nothing could come of it now; and deceit and lying were opposed to his nature.
He had previously communicated his plan to the former, who aided the deceit by quitting his house, under the pretence of a journey and concealed himself, with his daughter, in an obscure part of Paris.
Then, worn out by deceit, treasons, infidelity, and the whole body of terrestrial misery, what does he find at the end of his career?
And already, ye higher men--let me tickle you with this complimentary and flattering name, as he himself doeth--already doth mine evil spirit of deceit and magic attack me, my melancholy devil,
Mine to vindicate through all risks and all sacrifices--through the hopeless struggle against Rank and Power, through the long fight with armed deceit and fortified Success, through the waste of my reputation, through the loss of my friends, through the hazard of my life.
know, if you attempt to use deceit toward me any further.
Brocklehurst, I believe I intimated in the letter which I wrote to you three weeks ago, that this little girl has not quite the character and disposition I could wish: should you admit her into Lowood school, I should be glad if the superintendent and teachers were requested to keep a strict eye on her, and, above all, to guard against her worst fault, a tendency to deceit.
The end is, that you leave to your cousin and your friend the legacy of this woman's vengeance and this woman's deceit -vengeance made more resolute, deceit made more devilish than ever, by her exasperation at her own failure.