deceit


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

de·ceit

 (dĭ-sēt′)
n.
1. The act or practice of deceiving; deception.
2. A stratagem; a trick.
3. The quality of being deceitful; falseness.

[Middle English deceite, from Old French, from past participle of deceveir, to deceive; see deceive.]

deceit

(dɪˈsiːt)
n
1. the act or practice of deceiving
2. a statement, act, or device intended to mislead; fraud; trick
3. a tendency to deceive
[C13: from Old French deceite, from deceivre to deceive]

de•ceit

(dɪˈsit)

n.
1. the act or practice of deceiving.
2. a stratagem intended to deceive.
3. the quality of being deceitful; duplicity.
[1225–75; deceite < Old French, n. use of feminine of deceit, past participle of deceivre to deceive]
syn: deceit, guile, duplicity, fraud refer either to practices designed to mislead or to the qualities in a person that prompt such behavior. deceit is intentional concealment or misrepresentation of the truth: Consumers are often victims of deceit. guile is cunning deceit; it suggests subtle but treacherous tactics: He used guile to gain access to the documents. duplicity is doing the opposite of what one says or pretends to do; it suggests hypocrisy or pretense: the duplicity of a friend who does not keep a secret. fraud refers to deceit or trickery by which one may derive benefit at another's expense; it often suggests illegal or dishonest practices: an advertiser convicted of fraud.

Deceit

 of lapwing: a flock of lapwing—Lipton, 1970.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deceit - the quality of being fraudulentdeceit - the quality of being fraudulent  
dishonesty - the quality of being dishonest
2.deceit - a misleading falsehooddeceit - a misleading falsehood    
bill of goods - communication (written or spoken) that persuades someone to accept something untrue or undesirable; "they tried to sell me a bill of goods about a secondhand car"
humbug, snake oil - communication (written or spoken) intended to deceive
falsehood, untruth, falsity - a false statement
half-truth - a partially true statement intended to deceive or mislead
window dressing, facade - a showy misrepresentation intended to conceal something unpleasant
overstatement, exaggeration, magnification - making to seem more important than it really is
snow job - a long and elaborate misrepresentation
dissembling, feigning, pretense, pretence - pretending with intention to deceive
subterfuge, blind - something intended to misrepresent the true nature of an activity; "he wasn't sick--it was just a subterfuge"; "the holding company was just a blind"
hanky panky, hocus-pocus, jiggery-pokery, skulduggery, skullduggery, slickness, trickery - verbal misrepresentation intended to take advantage of you in some way
duplicity, fraudulence - a fraudulent or duplicitous representation
equivocation, evasion - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth
3.deceit - the act of deceiving
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts
fakery - the act of faking (or the product of faking)
indirection - deceitful action that is not straightforward; "he could see through the indirections of diplomats"
chicanery, wile, shenanigan, trickery, guile, chicane - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
double-dealing, duplicity - acting in bad faith; deception by pretending to entertain one set of intentions while acting under the influence of another
cheating, cheat - a deception for profit to yourself
head game, illusion, delusion - the act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas
pretending, pretense, feigning, simulation, pretence - the act of giving a false appearance; "his conformity was only pretending"
imposture, impersonation - pretending to be another person
obscurantism - a deliberate act intended to make something obscure
four flush, bluff - the act of bluffing in poker; deception by a false show of confidence in the strength of your cards
take-in - the act of taking in as by fooling or cheating or swindling someone

deceit

deceit

noun
The act or practice of deceiving:
Translations
خُدْعَه، خِداع
podvod
bedrageri
harhautushuijaushuiputuspetospetosyritys
svik
apgaulingumasklastingailinkęs meluotimelagingaimelagingumas
krāpšanamaldināšana
prevara

deceit

[dɪˈsiːt] N (= misleading) → engaño m; (= fraud) → fraude m; (= deceitfulness) → falsedad f
he was involved in a web of lies and deceitestaba metido en una maraña de mentiras y engaños
they won the voters over by deceitconquistaron a los votantes engañándolos or mediante engaños

deceit

[dɪˈsiːt] n (= deception) → tromperie f
I acquired the habit of deceit, of lying
BUT Je pris l'habitude de tromper, de mentir.

deceit

nBetrug m no pl, → Täuschung f; these unending deceitsdiese endlosen Täuschungsmanöver; a character full of deceitein durch und durch falscher Charakter

deceit

[dɪˈsiːt] n (quality) → disonestà; (action) → inganno, truffa

deceit

(diˈsiːt) noun
(an act of) deceiving. She was too honest to be capable of deceit.
deˈceitful adjective
deceiving or insincere. She's such a deceitful child!
deˈceitfully adverb
deˈceitfulness noun

deceit is spelt with -ei-.
References in classic literature ?
And that cultivates deceit, for I don't tell them I'm awake--O no!
He can't help playing jokes on her, he is so fond of her and she is so innocent and unsuspecting; and when she finds it out she cuffs him and is in a fury, but presently forgives him because it's him; and maybe the very next day she's caught with another joke; you see she can't learn any better, because she hasn't any deceit in her, and that kind aren't ever expecting it in another person.
What has it been but a system of hypocrisy and deceit,espionage, and treachery?
Brocklehurst, I believe I intimated in the letter which I wrote to you three weeks ago, that this little girl has not quite the character and disposition I could wish: should you admit her into Lowood school, I should be glad if the superintendent and teachers were requested to keep a strict eye on her, and, above all, to guard against her worst fault, a tendency to deceit.
Come in,' said I, taking Cathy by the arm and half forcing her to re-enter; for she lingered, viewing with troubled eyes the features of the speaker, too stern to express his inward deceit.
The greater the accumulation of deceit and trouble in the world, the brighter and the purer shone the star of Dora high above the world.
Macey, though he joined in the defence of Marner against all suspicions of deceit, also pooh-poohed the tinder-box; indeed, repudiated it as a rather impious suggestion, tending to imply that everything must be done by human hands, and that there was no power which could make away with the guineas without moving the bricks.
Go therefore, half this day as friend with friend Converse with ADAM, in what Bowre or shade Thou find'st him from the heat of Noon retir'd, To respit his day-labour with repast, Or with repose; and such discourse bring on, As may advise him of his happie state, Happiness in his power left free to will, Left to his own free Will, his Will though free, Yet mutable; whence warne him to beware He swerve not too secure: tell him withall His danger, and from whom, what enemie Late falln himself from Heav'n, is plotting now The fall of others from like state of bliss; By violence, no, for that shall be withstood, But by deceit and lies; this let him know, Least wilfully transgressing he pretend Surprisal, unadmonisht, unforewarnd.
She told him of the old woman's deceit, and how she had taken the three children away and hidden them.
Fraud, deceit, or malice had then not yet mingled with truth and sincerity.
It is the peculiar province, for instance, of a court of equity to relieve against what are called hard bargains: these are contracts in which, though there may have been no direct fraud or deceit, sufficient to invalidate them in a court of law, yet there may have been some undue and unconscionable advantage taken of the necessities or misfortunes of one of the parties, which a court of equity would not tolerate.
But the clerks were not the dupes of this deceit, and their lugubrious looks settled down into resigned countenances.