deceive


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de·ceive

 (dĭ-sēv′)
v. de·ceived, de·ceiv·ing, de·ceives
v.tr.
1. To cause to believe what is not true; mislead.
2. Archaic To catch by guile; ensnare.
v.intr.
1. To practice deceit.
2. To give a false impression: appearances can deceive.

[Middle English deceiven, from Old French deceveir, from Vulgar Latin *dēcipēre, from Latin dēcipere, to ensnare, deceive : dē-, de- + capere, to seize; see kap- in Indo-European roots.]

de·ceiv′a·ble adj.
de·ceiv′er n.
de·ceiv′ing·ly adv.
Synonyms: deceive, mislead, delude, dupe, hoodwink, bamboozle
These verbs mean to cause someone to believe something untrue, usually with an ulterior motive in mind. Deceive, the most general, stresses the deliberate misrepresentation of what one knows to be true: "We are inclined to believe those whom we do not know, because they have never deceived us" (Samuel Johnson).
To mislead is to direct toward a wrong conclusion, as by the use of half-truths or obfuscation; it is often but not always intentional: "Writing for young people may tempt authors to oversimplify technical information, which may mislead or confuse the reader" (Margaret Bush).
Delude can imply a deception so thorough as to foster belief that is not merely misplaced but often irrational; it may also imply a strong dose of wishful thinking: "We [working parents] delude ourselves into believing that extended day programs, baby sitters and latchkey arrangements fill the bill" (Ann Symonds).
To dupe is to play upon another's susceptibilities or naiveté: The shoppers were duped by false advertising. Hoodwink and the informal bamboozle refer to deception by hoaxing, trickery, or artful persuasion: "Worst of all ... the orchestra manager ... has somehow hoodwinked me with his courtly southern manner into signing another multiyear contract" (Arnold Steinhardt). "Perhaps if I wanted to be understood or to understand I would bamboozle myself into belief, but I am a reporter" (Graham Greene).

deceive

(dɪˈsiːv)
vb (tr)
1. to mislead by deliberate misrepresentation or lies
2. (Psychology) to delude (oneself)
3. to be unfaithful to (one's sexual partner)
4. archaic to disappoint: his hopes were deceived.
[C13: from Old French deceivre, from Latin dēcipere to ensnare, cheat, from capere to take]
deˈceivable adj
deˈceivably adv
deˈceivableness, deˌceivaˈbility n
deˈceiver n
deˈceiving n, adj
deˈceivingly adv

de•ceive

(dɪˈsiv)

v. -ceived, -ceiv•ing. v.t.
1. to mislead by a false appearance or statement; trick.
2. to be unfaithful to (one's spouse or lover).
3. Archaic. to while away (time).
v.i.
4. to practice deceit.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French deceivre < Latin dēcipere literally, to ensnare]
de•ceiv′er, n.
de•ceiv′ing•ly, adv.
syn: See cheat.

deceive


Past participle: deceived
Gerund: deceiving

Imperative
deceive
deceive
Present
I deceive
you deceive
he/she/it deceives
we deceive
you deceive
they deceive
Preterite
I deceived
you deceived
he/she/it deceived
we deceived
you deceived
they deceived
Present Continuous
I am deceiving
you are deceiving
he/she/it is deceiving
we are deceiving
you are deceiving
they are deceiving
Present Perfect
I have deceived
you have deceived
he/she/it has deceived
we have deceived
you have deceived
they have deceived
Past Continuous
I was deceiving
you were deceiving
he/she/it was deceiving
we were deceiving
you were deceiving
they were deceiving
Past Perfect
I had deceived
you had deceived
he/she/it had deceived
we had deceived
you had deceived
they had deceived
Future
I will deceive
you will deceive
he/she/it will deceive
we will deceive
you will deceive
they will deceive
Future Perfect
I will have deceived
you will have deceived
he/she/it will have deceived
we will have deceived
you will have deceived
they will have deceived
Future Continuous
I will be deceiving
you will be deceiving
he/she/it will be deceiving
we will be deceiving
you will be deceiving
they will be deceiving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been deceiving
you have been deceiving
he/she/it has been deceiving
we have been deceiving
you have been deceiving
they have been deceiving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been deceiving
you will have been deceiving
he/she/it will have been deceiving
we will have been deceiving
you will have been deceiving
they will have been deceiving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been deceiving
you had been deceiving
he/she/it had been deceiving
we had been deceiving
you had been deceiving
they had been deceiving
Conditional
I would deceive
you would deceive
he/she/it would deceive
we would deceive
you would deceive
they would deceive
Past Conditional
I would have deceived
you would have deceived
he/she/it would have deceived
we would have deceived
you would have deceived
they would have deceived
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.deceive - be false to; be dishonest with
betray, sell - deliver to an enemy by treachery; "Judas sold Jesus"; "The spy betrayed his country"
victimise, victimize - make a victim of; "I was victimized by this con-man"
chisel, cheat - engage in deceitful behavior; practice trickery or fraud; "Who's chiseling on the side?"
shill - act as a shill; "The shill bid for the expensive carpet during the auction in order to drive the price up"
flim-flam, fob, fox, play a trick on, play tricks, pull a fast one on, trick, play a joke on - deceive somebody; "We tricked the teacher into thinking that class would be cancelled next week"
befool, fool, gull - make a fool or dupe of
cheat on, cuckold, wander, betray, cheat - be sexually unfaithful to one's partner in marriage; "She cheats on her husband"; "Might her husband be wandering?"
hoax, play a joke on, pull someone's leg - subject to a playful hoax or joke
ensnare, entrap, frame, set up - take or catch as if in a snare or trap; "I was set up!"; "The innocent man was framed by the police"
humbug - trick or deceive
2.deceive - cause someone to believe an untruthdeceive - cause someone to believe an untruth; "The insurance company deceived me when they told me they were covering my house"
misinform, mislead - give false or misleading information to
personate, pose, impersonate - pretend to be someone you are not; sometimes with fraudulent intentions; "She posed as the Czar's daughter"
lead by the nose, play false, pull the wool over someone's eyes, bamboozle, hoodwink, snow - conceal one's true motives from especially by elaborately feigning good intentions so as to gain an end; "He bamboozled his professors into thinking that he knew the subject well"
cod, dupe, put one across, put one over, slang, take in, gull, befool, fool, put on - fool or hoax; "The immigrant was duped because he trusted everyone"; "You can't fool me!"
undeceive - free from deception or illusion

deceive

verb take in, trick, fool (informal), cheat, con (informal), kid (informal), stiff (slang), sting (informal), mislead, betray, lead (someone) on (informal), hoax, dupe, beguile, delude, swindle, outwit, ensnare, bamboozle (informal), hoodwink, entrap, double-cross (informal), take for a ride (informal), pull a fast one on (slang), cozen, pull the wool over (someone's) eyes He has deceived and disillusioned us all.
be deceived by something or someone be taken in by, fall for, swallow (informal), take the bait, be made a fool of by, be the dupe of, swallow hook, line, and sinker (informal) I was deceived by her innocent expression.

deceive

verb
To cause to accept what is false, especially by trickery or misrepresentation:
Informal: bamboozle, have.
Slang: four-flush.
Translations
خدعيَخْدَعُيَخْدَع، يَغُش
oklamatklamat
bedragenarresnyde
trompi
pettäähuijata
zavarati
becsap
svíkja
だます
속이다
mentiri
klaidintisuklaidinti
krāptmaldināt
premamitivarati
bedralura
หลอกลวง
lừa dối

deceive

[dɪˈsiːv] VTengañar
she deceived me into thinking thatme engañó, haciéndome pensar que ...
don't be deceived by appearancesno te dejes engañar por las apariencias
let nobody be deceived by thisque nadie se llame a engaño por esto
he thought his eyes were deceiving himno creía lo que veían sus ojos
if my memory does not deceive mesi mal no recuerdo
to deceive o.sengañarse

deceive

[dɪˈsiːv] vttromper
to deceive sb into doing sth → amener qn à faire qch par la ruse
to deceive o.s. → se faire des illusions
to deceive o.s. about sth → se mentir à soi-même sur qch
to deceive o.s. that ... → se convaincre à tort que ...

deceive

vttäuschen, trügen (geh); one’s wife, husbandbetrügen; to deceive somebody into doing somethingjdn durch Täuschung dazu bringen, etw zu tun; are my eyes deceiving me - is it really you?täuschen mich meine Augen, oder bist du es wirklich?; to deceive oneselfsich (dat)selbst etwas vormachen
vitrügen (geh), → täuschen

deceive

[dɪˈsiːv] vtingannare
she deceived me into thinking that ... → mi ha ingannato facendomi credere che...
unless my eyes deceive me → se gli occhi non m'ingannano
don't be deceived by appearances → non ti fare ingannare dalle apparenze
to deceive o.s. → ingannarsi, illudersi

deceive

(diˈsiːv) verb
to mislead or cause to make mistakes, usually by giving or suggesting false information. He was deceived by her innocent appearance.

deceive is spelt with -ei-.

deceive

يَخْدَعُ oklamat bedrage täuschen εξαπατώ engañar pettää tromper zavarati ingannare だます 속이다 bedriegen bedra oszukać enganar обманывать lura หลอกลวง yanıltmak lừa dối 欺骗

deceive

vt. engañar, defraudar, embaucar.
References in classic literature ?
As everyone exclaimed, and Beth hugged the cropped head tenderly, Jo assumed an indifferent air, which did not deceive anyone a particle, and said, rumpling up the brown bush and trying to look as if she liked it, "It doesn't affect the fate of the nation, so don't wail, Beth.
But it ain't right to deceive us, son, and it brings blame on us.
you cannot deceive me," and Mademoiselle approached her beloved instrument and began to play.
Whether this answer affected their courage, or not, I cannot tell; but, contrary to our expectations, they formed a scheme to deceive us, declaring it was their orders, from Governor Hamilton, to take us captives, and not to destroy us; but if nine of us would come out, and treat with them, they would immediatly withdraw their forces from our walls, and return home peaceably.
He was beginning to deceive her as he had never deceived her mother.
But I was not born a gentleman; neither have I lived like one," said Holgrave, slightly smiling; "so, my dear madam, you will hardly expect me to sympathize with sensibilities of this kind; though, unless I deceive myself, I have some imperfect comprehension of them.
These men deceive themselves," said Roger Chillingworth, with somewhat more emphasis than usual, and making a slight gesture with his forefinger.
It was an exceedingly long lay that, indeed; and though from the magnitude of the figure it might at first deceive a landsman, yet the slightest consideration will show that though seven hundred and seventy-seven is a pretty large number, yet, when you come to make a teenth of it, you will then see, I say, that the seven hundred and seventy-seventh part of a farthing is a good deal less than seven hundred and seventy-seven gold doubloons; and so I thought at the time.
It was of no use for them to try to deceive him; he knew as much about the situation as they did, and he knew that the family might literally starve to death.
She had noted the slight, dry cough, the daily brightening cheek; nor could the lustre of the eye, and the airy buoyancy born of fever, deceive her.
I could not deceive such trusting simplicity, so I said it was a mistake; that when my fireworks killed at all, they killed instantly; no, the men would not die, there was something wrong about my apparatus, I couldn't tell what; but we must hurry and get away, for those people would attack us again, in a minute.
A jay will lie, a jay will steal, a jay will deceive, a jay will betray; and four times out of five, a jay will go back on his solemnest promise.