deception


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de·cep·tion

 (dĭ-sĕp′shən)
n.
1. The use of deceit.
2. The fact or state of being deceived.
3. A ruse; a trick.

[Middle English decepcioun, from Old French deception, from Late Latin dēceptiō, dēceptiōn-, from Latin dēceptus, past participle of dēcipere, to deceive; see deceive.]

deception

(dɪˈsɛpʃən)
n
1. the act of deceiving or the state of being deceived
2. something that deceives; trick

de•cep•tion

(dɪˈsɛp ʃən)

n.
1. the act of deceiving, or the state of being deceived.
2. something that deceives or is intended to deceive; trick; ruse.
[1400–50; late Middle English decepcioun < Old French < Late Latin dēceptiō= Latin dēcep-, variant s. of dēcipere (see deceive) + -tiō -tion]

deception

Those measures designed to mislead the enemy by manipulation, distortion, or falsification of evidence to induce the enemy to react in a manner prejudicial to the enemy's interests. See also counterdeception; military deception.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deception - a misleading falsehooddeception - a misleading falsehood    
bill of goods - communication (written or spoken) that persuades someone to accept something untrue or undesirable; "they tried to sell me a bill of goods about a secondhand car"
humbug, snake oil - communication (written or spoken) intended to deceive
falsehood, untruth, falsity - a false statement
half-truth - a partially true statement intended to deceive or mislead
window dressing, facade - a showy misrepresentation intended to conceal something unpleasant
overstatement, exaggeration, magnification - making to seem more important than it really is
snow job - a long and elaborate misrepresentation
dissembling, feigning, pretense, pretence - pretending with intention to deceive
subterfuge, blind - something intended to misrepresent the true nature of an activity; "he wasn't sick--it was just a subterfuge"; "the holding company was just a blind"
hanky panky, hocus-pocus, jiggery-pokery, skulduggery, skullduggery, slickness, trickery - verbal misrepresentation intended to take advantage of you in some way
duplicity, fraudulence - a fraudulent or duplicitous representation
equivocation, evasion - a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth
2.deception - the act of deceiving
falsification, misrepresentation - a willful perversion of facts
fakery - the act of faking (or the product of faking)
indirection - deceitful action that is not straightforward; "he could see through the indirections of diplomats"
chicanery, wile, shenanigan, trickery, guile, chicane - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
double-dealing, duplicity - acting in bad faith; deception by pretending to entertain one set of intentions while acting under the influence of another
cheating, cheat - a deception for profit to yourself
head game, illusion, delusion - the act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas
pretending, pretense, feigning, simulation, pretence - the act of giving a false appearance; "his conformity was only pretending"
imposture, impersonation - pretending to be another person
obscurantism - a deliberate act intended to make something obscure
four flush, bluff - the act of bluffing in poker; deception by a false show of confidence in the strength of your cards
take-in - the act of taking in as by fooling or cheating or swindling someone
3.deception - an illusory featdeception - an illusory feat; considered magical by naive observers
performance - the act of presenting a play or a piece of music or other entertainment; "we congratulated him on his performance at the rehearsal"; "an inspired performance of Mozart's C minor concerto"
card trick - a trick performed with playing cards
prestidigitation, sleight of hand - manual dexterity in the execution of tricks

deception

noun
2. trick, lie, fraud, cheat, bluff, sham, snare, hoax, decoy, ruse, artifice, subterfuge, canard, feint, stratagem, porky (Brit. slang), pork pie (Brit. slang), wile, hokum (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), leg-pull (Brit. informal), imposture, snow job (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.) You've been the victim of a rather cruel deception.
Quotations
"O what a tangled web we weave,"
"When first we practise to deceive!" [Walter Scott Marmion]
"you can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you cannot fool all of the people all of the time" [ascribed to Abraham Lincoln]
"One may smile, and smile, and be a villain" [William Shakespeare Hamlet]
"We are never so easily deceived as when we imagine we are deceiving others" [Duc de la Rochefoucauld Maxims]

deception

noun
1. The act or practice of deceiving:
2. An indirect, usually cunning means of gaining an end:
Informal: shenanigan, take-in.
Translations
خِداع، غِش
podvodklam
bedragbedrageri
petos
blekking
apgaulingai
blēdībakrāpšanamaldināšana
hilekandırma

deception

[dɪˈsepʃən] Nengaño m

deception

[dɪˈsɛpʃən] n
(= deceiving) → tromperie f
(LAW) to obtain sth by deception → obtenir qch par des moyens frauduleux

deception

n
(= act of deceiving)Täuschung f, → Betrug m no pl (→ of an +dat); (of wife etc)Betrug m
(= state of being deceived)Täuschung f
(= that which deceives)Täuschung f

deception

[dɪˈsɛpʃn] ninganno
to practise deception on sb → raggirare qn

deception

(diˈsepʃən) noun
(an act of) deceiving. Deception is difficult in these circumstances.
deˈceptive (-tiv) adjective
deceiving; misleading. Appearances may be deceptive.
deˈceptively adjective
She is deceptively shy.
References in classic literature ?
Poor little souls, they will have a hard time, I'm afraid, but they won't suffer, and it will do them good," she said, producing the more palatable viands with which she had provided herself, and disposing of the bad breakfast, so that their feelings might not be hurt, a motherly little deception for which they were grateful.
hesitatingly answered Heyward, to whom deception was too new to be assumed without embarrassment.
Cunning and deception become necessary, inevitable habits.
If I did not sit, the man would perceive that we were only pretending to be equals -- and playing the deception pretty poorly, too.
This amounts to deception, and will injure him for the Sunday-schools.
I have frequently detected myself in such kind of mistakes," said Elinor, "in a total misapprehension of character in some point or other: fancying people so much more gay or grave, or ingenious or stupid than they really are, and I can hardly tell why or in what the deception originated.
This is not thy deception, nor thy witchcraft: it is the work of nature.
A girl who takes the sharpest people unawares by using such a capacity as this to help her own objects in private life, and who sharpens that capacity by a determination to fight her way to her own purpose, which has beaten down everything before it, up to this time -- is a girl who tries an experiment in deception, new enough and dangerous enough to lead, one way or the other, to very serious results.
In aid of the kind deception to be practised on his daughter, Miss Pross was to write, describing his having been called away professionally, and referring to an imaginary letter of two or three hurried lines in his own hand, represented to have been addressed to her by the same post.
To repay my confidence with systematic deception, for her sake, and quit me for her
Firm we subsist, yet possible to swerve, Since Reason not impossibly may meet Some specious object by the Foe subornd, And fall into deception unaware, Not keeping strictest watch, as she was warnd.
The wise and attentive precautions adopted for his safety touched Richard's feelings, and removed any slight grudge which he might retain on account of the deception the Outlaw Captain had practised upon him.