deceptive


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Related to deceptive: feigning, subterfuge, Passive aggressive

de·cep·tive

 (dĭ-sĕp′tĭv)
adj.
Deceiving or tending to deceive: a deceptive advertisement.

de·cep′tive·ness n.

deceptive

(dɪˈsɛptɪv)
adj
1. likely or designed to deceive; misleading: appearances can be deceptive.
2. (Classical Music) music (of a cadence) another word for interrupted3
deˈceptively adv
deˈceptiveness n

de•cep•tive

(dɪˈsɛp tɪv)

adj.
1. likely to deceive; capable of deception.
2. perceptually misleading.
[1605–15; < Medieval Latin]
de•cep′tive•ly, adv.
de•cep′tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.deceptive - causing one to believe what is not true or fail to believe what is true; "deceptive calm"; "a delusory pleasure"
unreal - not actually such; being or seeming fanciful or imaginary; "this conversation is getting more and more unreal"; "the fantastically unreal world of government bureaucracy"; "the unreal world of advertising art"
2.deceptive - designed to deceive or mislead either deliberately or inadvertently; "the deceptive calm in the eye of the storm"; "deliberately deceptive packaging"; "a misleading similarity"; "statistics can be presented in ways that are misleading"; "shoddy business practices"
dishonest, dishonorable - deceptive or fraudulent; disposed to cheat or defraud or deceive

deceptive

deceptive

adjective
Tending to lead one into error:
Translations
خادِع، مُضَلِّل
klamnýošidnýpodvodnýzavádějící
bedragerisk
petollinen
déceptiftrompeur
blekkjandi
klamlivý
aldatıcı

deceptive

[dɪˈseptɪv] ADJengañoso

deceptive

[dɪˈsɛptɪv] adjtrompeur/euse

deceptive

adjirreführend; similaritytäuschend; simplicitytrügerisch; to be deceptivetäuschen, trügen (geh); appearances are or can be deceptiveder Schein trügt

deceptive

[dɪˈsɛptɪv] adj (likely to deceive) → ingannevole; (meant to deceive) → ingannatore/trice

deception

(diˈsepʃən) noun
(an act of) deceiving. Deception is difficult in these circumstances.
deˈceptive (-tiv) adjective
deceiving; misleading. Appearances may be deceptive.
deˈceptively adjective
She is deceptively shy.
References in classic literature ?
Judge not too rashly from hasty and deceptive appearances," said the lady, smiling; "though Major Heyward can assume such deep notes on occasion, believe me, his natural tones are better fitted for a mellow tenor than the bass you heard.
But these transparent natures are often deceptive in their depth; those pebbles at the bottom of the fountain are farther from us than we think.
Ever and anon a bright, but, alas, deceptive idea would dart you through.
At any rate --though indeed such a test at such a time might be deceptive --spoutings might be discovered from our low boat that seemed playing up almost from the rim of the horizon.
But it was an obstinate pair of shoulders; they could not seem to learn the trick of stooping with any sort of deceptive naturalness.
A few rays of light, a wan, sinister light, that seemed to have been stolen from an expiring luminary, fell through some opening or other upon an old tower that raised its pasteboard battlements on the stage; everything, in this deceptive light, adopted a fantastic shape.
Although at first the deceptive marriage of Mademoiselle Cormon made a laugh throughout the town, which was soon initiated into the story of the case, before long Madame du Bousquier won the esteem and sympathy of all the women.
Do not forget that I have been five years in the Bastile and that no medium of viewing things is so deceptive as the grating of a prison.
Even the more mature experience of his parents was misled by the deceptive symptoms that his complaint assumed in the commencement of summer.
Dinah was too entirely reliant on the Supreme guidance to attempt to achieve any end by a deceptive concealment.
I asked on what basis the calm rested--I feared it might be deceptive.
you speak of the dead; the dead, at least, were full of respect and submission; they resigned themselves to an order of exile; they carried their despair away with them in their hearts, like a priceless possession, because the despair was caused by the woman they loved, and because death, thus deceptive, was like a gift or a favor conferred upon them.