decibel

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decibel
range of human hearing in decibels

de·ci·bel

 (dĕs′ə-bəl, -bĕl′)
n. Abbr. dB
A unit used to express relative difference in power or intensity, usually between two acoustic or electric signals, equal to ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of the two levels.

[deci- + bel.]

decibel

(ˈdɛsɪˌbɛl)
n
1. (Units) a unit for comparing two currents, voltages, or power levels, equal to one tenth of a bel
2. (Units) a similar unit for measuring the intensity of a sound. It is equal to ten times the logarithm to the base ten of the ratio of the intensity of the sound to be measured to the intensity of some reference sound, usually the lowest audible note of the same frequency
Abbreviation: dB

dec•i•bel

(ˈdɛs əˌbɛl, -bəl)

n.
a unit used to express differences in power, esp. in acoustics or electronics: equal to ten times the common logarithm of the ratio of two signals. Abbr.: dB
[1925–30; deci- + bel]

de·ci·bel

(dĕs′ə-bəl)
A unit used to measure the loudness or intensity of a sound. The speaking voice of most people ranges from 45 to 75 decibels. See Note at sound1.

decibel

1. A logarithmic unit of sound intensity.
2. (dB) A measure of relative sound intensity.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.decibel - a logarithmic unit of sound intensity; 10 times the logarithm of the ratio of the sound intensity to some reference intensity
sound unit - any acoustic unit of measurement
Translations
وِحْدَة ارْتِفاع الصَّوْت
decibel
decibel
desibeli
decibel
desíbel
decibelas
decibels
decibel

decibel

[ˈdesɪbel] Ndecibelio m

decibel

[ˈdɛsɪbɛl] ndécibel m

decibel

nDezibel nt

decibel

[ˈdɛsɪbɛl] ndecibel m inv

decibel

(ˈdesibel) , (ˈdesibəl) noun
(abbreviation db) the main unit of measurement of the loudness of a sound. Traffic noise is measured in decibels.

decibel

n decibelio, decibel m
References in periodicals archive ?
Those operating in purely commercial areas should not go beyond 60 decibels during the day and 35 decibels at night.
He said an Asian Development Bank (ADB) study placed the national standard for daytime outside noise at 60 decibels, and 50 decibels at night time.
Researchers who study hearing loss in the workplace have found that a person who is exposed to noise levels above 85 decibels for a prolonged period of time is at risk for hearing loss.
Sounds at 85-90 decibels or above may initially cause pain and temporary deafness.
Exposure to more than 100 decibels is usual in such spaces.
The noise from a train horn (more than 110 decibels at 100 feet) can have an impact greater than a siren.
We concur that the decibel scale is logarithmic and a 10-decibel increase is a tenfold increase in sound power.
HOSPITALS Now there''s an additional reason to be wary of them - a stay there can be prolonged due to the stress-inducing levels of the irregular sounds, like machines beeping and doors banging, which medical journal The Lancet found to be at least 15 decibels above the WHO-recommended 40.
noisy office can be as 80 NEIGHBOURS A bass drum can hit 100 decibels, more than twice the recommended limit, which is one thing if it's coming from the stage at a festival, but it''s quite another if it''s pounding through the wall from at 3am (then there''s the DIY noises, barking dogs.
NEIGHBOURS A bass drum can hit 100 decibels, more than twice the recommended limit, which is one thing if it's coming from the noisy be as 80 the stage at a festival, but it''s quite another if it''s pounding through the wall from at 3am (then there''s the DIY noises, barking dogs.
Long-term exposure to sounds over 85 decibels can cause hearing loss, and noise-induced hearing loss can also be caused by a one-time exposure to an intensely loud noise.
Although the amount of construction taking place across the city after dark has not been as abundant as during the economic boom, authorities continue to extend their concern to residents so that any type of construction does not exceed 45 decibels.