decidable


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de·cide

 (dĭ-sīd′)
v. de·cid·ed, de·cid·ing, de·cides
v.tr.
1.
a. To reach a conclusion or form a judgment or opinion about (something) by reasoning or consideration: decide what to do.
b. To cause to make or reach a decision: "The presence of so many witnesses decided him at once to flee" (Robert Louis Stevenson).
2. To settle conclusively all contention or uncertainty about: decide a case; decided the dispute in favor of the workers.
3. To influence or determine the outcome of: A few votes decided the election.
v.intr.
1. To pronounce a judgment; announce a verdict.
2. To reach a decision; make up one's mind.

[Middle English deciden, from Old French decider, from Latin dēcīdere, to cut off, decide : dē-, de- + caedere, to cut; see kaə-id- in Indo-European roots.]

de·cid·a·bil′i·ty n.
de·cid′a·ble adj.
de·cid′er n.
Synonyms: decide, determine, settle, rule, conclude, resolve
These verbs mean to come to a decision about. Decide has the broadest range: The judge will decide the case on its merits. We decided to postpone our vacation for a week.
Determine has a similar range but often involves somewhat narrower issues: The doctor determined the cause of the infection. The jury will determine the fate of the defendant.
Settle stresses finality of decision: "The lama waved a hand to show that the matter was finally settled in his mind" (Rudyard Kipling).
Rule implies that the decision is handed down by someone in authority: The committee ruled that changes in the curriculum should be implemented.
Conclude suggests that a decision, opinion, or judgment has been arrived at after careful consideration: She concluded that the criticism was unjust.
Resolve stresses the exercise of choice in making a firm decision: I resolved to lose weight.

decidable

(dɪˈsaɪdəbəl)
adj
1. (Logic) able to be decided
2. (Logic) logic (of a formal theory) having the property that it is possible by a mechanistic procedure to determine whether or not any well-formed formula is a theorem
References in periodicals archive ?
And no amount of growth in performance will make undecidable problems decidable.
The viewer of such shows could enjoy the thrill or anxiety of knowing that they themselves might be captured by the roving "candid" lens at any time, making the distinction between entertainment and real life something only decidable in retrospect.
The reachability analysis using stochastic hybrid automata is decidable when applying statistical model checking (SMC) technique to the verification of system.
Then, it is not decidable where to integrate changes [3], For example if software architect of Variant A decides to update boolean expression [=n] to [n=10] in component Ordering_Entry (between in port next item and out port done), while software architect of Variant B states that the same n will be n= 20, we are in the front of a conflict between architects, and merging process fails.
The objectivity of experimental sciences is, in this sense, an achievement, the successful construction of an "experimental situation that allow[s] what was questioned to make an actual, decidable difference.
As a consequence, the separation problem by group languages is decidable.
As we show in section 3 as a side note, such questions are in general difficult to answer: We observe a general theorem that in particular implies that the question whether a given ZFC-theorem can be proved in ZF alone is not algorithmically decidable.
Ambivalence as a situation with no decidable solution, with no fool-proof choice, no unreflective knowledge of how to go on (Bauman 1991).
We prove the following theorem announced by Zhil'tsov in 2000: the equational theory of the class of all epigroups coincides with the equational theory of the class of all finite epigroups and is decidable.
Our approach is based on a radically new compilation phase technique into a core type theory to modularize the difficulty of finding a decidable type checking algorithm for homotopy type theory.
Ng et al, "The EOQ problem with decidable warehouse capacity: Analysis, solution approaches and applications", Discrete Applied Mathematics, Pp.
A more specific and more decidable answer can be given for ontologies with facts as complexes having constituents of different categories.