declamation


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dec·la·ma·tion

 (dĕk′lə-mā′shən)
n.
1. A recitation delivered as an exercise in rhetoric or elocution.
2.
a. Vehement oratory.
b. A speech marked by strong feeling; a tirade.

[Middle English declamacioun, from Latin dēclāmātiō, dēclāmātiōn-, from dēclāmātus, past participle of dēclāmāre, to declaim; see declaim.]

declamation

(ˌdɛkləˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. (Rhetoric) a rhetorical or emotional speech, made esp in order to protest or condemn; tirade
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a speech, verse, etc, that is or can be spoken
3. (Rhetoric) the act or art of declaiming
4. (Classical Music) music the artistry or technique involved in singing recitative passages

dec•la•ma•tion

(ˌdɛk ləˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or art of declaiming.
2. exercise in oratory or elocution, as in the recitation of a classic speech.
3. speech or writing for oratorical effect.
[1350–1400; < Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.declamation - vehement oratorydeclamation - vehement oratory      
philippic, tirade, broadside - a speech of violent denunciation
oratory - addressing an audience formally (usually a long and rhetorical address and often pompous); "he loved the sound of his own oratory"
harangue, rant, ranting - a loud bombastic declamation expressed with strong emotion
raving - declaiming wildly; "the raving of maniacs"
2.declamation - recitation of a speech from memory with studied gestures and intonation as an exercise in elocution or rhetoric
recitation, recital, reading - a public instance of reciting or repeating (from memory) something prepared in advance; "the program included songs and recitations of well-loved poems"

declamation

noun speech, address, lecture, rant, tirade, harangue, oration, recitation Her warnings and declamations went unheeded.

declamation

noun
1. A usually formal oral communication to an audience:
2. The art of public speaking:
Translations

declamation

[ˌdekləˈmeɪʃən] Ndeclamación f

declamation

nDeklamation f; (against sth) → Tirade f

declamation

[ˌdɛkləˈmeɪʃn] ndeclamazione f
References in classic literature ?
Wopsle said grace with theatrical declamation - as it now appears to me, something like a religious cross of the Ghost in Hamlet with Richard the Third - and ended with the very proper aspiration that we might be truly grateful.
It was a place to quote Alastor in, and nothing but a bad memory prevented my affrighting the oaks and rills with declamation.
Admitting that he might be wrong, a frenzied declamation of the kind would turn him into a worm.
I saw he suspected I was going to take some very rash step; but repressing declamation or remonstrance, he only answered--
There was a vast deal of solemn deliberation, and hard Scottish reasoning, with an occasional swell of pompous declamation.
Epanchin was just wondering whether she would not forbid the performance after all, when, at the very moment that Aglaya commenced her declamation, two new guests, both talking loudly, entered from the street.
If the governor took any notice of me, and cared how I got on, I would n't mind the presents so much; but he don't care a hang, and never even asked if I did well last declamation day, when I 'd gone and learned 'The Battle of Lake Regillus,' because he said he liked it.
How long Mr Squeers might have declaimed, or how stormy a discussion his declamation might have led to, nobody knows.
They consisted of an elaborate scenic background set up near the city gate or on the street, with figures from allegorical or traditional history who engaged in some pantomime or declamation, but with very little dramatic dialog, or none.
I cut his declamation short by asking what answer Flora de Barral had given to his question.
Graham,' said I, suddenly stopping short, checked in my passionate declamation by unutterable feelings to behold her actually smiling at the picture of the ruin she had wrought.
His mouth was now as effectually stopt, as that of quack must be, if, in the midst of a declamation on the great virtues of his pills and powders, the corpse of one of his martyrs should be brought forth, and deposited before the stage, as a testimony of his skill.