declivity

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de·cliv·i·ty

 (dĭ-klĭv′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. de·cliv·i·ties
A downward slope, as of a hill.

[Latin dēclīvitās, from dēclīvis, sloping down : dē-, de- + clīvus, slope; see klei- in Indo-European roots.]

declivity

(dɪˈklɪvɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
a downward slope, esp of the ground. Compare acclivity
[C17: from Latin dēclīvitās, from de- + clīvus a slope, hill]
deˈclivitous adj

de•cliv•i•ty

(dɪˈklɪv ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
a downward slope (opposed to acclivity).
[1605–15; < Latin dēclīvitās a slope, hill =dēclīvi(s) sloping downward (dē- de- + -clīvis, adj. derivative of clīvus slope, hill) + -tās -ty2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.declivity - a downward slope or bend
downhill - the downward slope of a hill
incline, slope, side - an elevated geological formation; "he climbed the steep slope"; "the house was built on the side of a mountain"
steep - a steep place (as on a hill)

declivity

noun
A downward slope or distance:
Translations

declivity

[dɪˈklɪvɪtɪ] Ndeclive m

declivity

References in classic literature ?
In the hollow breast of the mountains which they were now penetrating, the surrounding heights were clothed with pine; while the declivities of the lower hills afforded abundance of bunch grass for the horses.
The rigorous winters and sultry summers, and all the capricious inequalities of temperature prevalent on the Atlantic side of the mountains, are but little felt on their western declivities.
Along both ranges of hills, which bounded the opposite sides of the lake and valley, clouds of light vapor were rising in spiral wreaths from the uninhabited woods, looking like the smoke of hidden cottages; or rolled lazily down the declivities, to mingle with the fogs of the lower land.
Here wind deep declivities and sharp angles--ripe terrain for refuge for those on the run from authority (Jh 1:28, 3:22-26, 10:39-41; cf Mk 10:1).
In "Nursing Home," where we encounter a woman with dementia-like symptoms, a verse opening ("Brain scans on her show//her perisylvian pathways and declivities / choked by cities") is followed by a prose piece, which reads as an extract from an academic paper.
Large increases of the unsprung mass velocity can be observed, only for large declivities, followed by straight areas of the rolling surface.