decomposition


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de·com·po·si·tion

 (dē-kŏm′pə-zĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The act or result of decomposing; disintegration.
2.
a. Chemistry Separation into constituents by chemical reaction.
b. Biology Breakdown or decay of organic materials.

de·com′po·si′tion·al adj.

de·com·po·si·tion

(dē-kŏm′pə-zĭsh′ən)
1. The separation of a substance into simpler substances or basic elements.
2. The process of decaying or rotting. Decomposition of dead organic matter is brought about by the activity of certain bacteria and fungi feeding on it.

decomposition

The process of breakdown of a chemical compound into less complex substances.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.decomposition - the analysis of a vector field
vector algebra - the part of algebra that deals with the theory of vectors and vector spaces
2.decomposition - in a decomposed state
fragmentation - the disintegration of social norms governing behavior and thought and social relationships
decay - an inferior state resulting from the process of decaying; "the corpse was in an advanced state of decay"; "the house had fallen into a serious state of decay and disrepair"
3.decomposition - (chemistry) separation of a substance into two or more substances that may differ from each other and from the original substance
chemical science, chemistry - the science of matter; the branch of the natural sciences dealing with the composition of substances and their properties and reactions
chemical reaction, reaction - (chemistry) a process in which one or more substances are changed into others; "there was a chemical reaction of the lime with the ground water"
electrolysis - (chemistry) a chemical decomposition reaction produced by passing an electric current through a solution containing ions
4.decomposition - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal actiondecomposition - (biology) the process of decay caused by bacterial or fungal action
biological science, biology - the science that studies living organisms
decay - the process of gradually becoming inferior
5.decomposition - the organic phenomenon of rotting
organic phenomenon - (biology) a natural phenomenon involving living plants and animals

decomposition

noun (Formal)
1. rot, corruption, decay, rotting, perishing, mortification, putrefaction, putrescence, putridity The bodies were in an advanced state of decomposition.
2. breakdown, disintegration, dissolution, atomization a nuclear reactor which gives complete decomposition and no unwanted byproducts

decomposition

noun
Translations
تَحَلُّل، انْحِلال
rozklad
forrådnelsenedbrydelse
hajoaminen
bomlás
rotnun
afbraakdecompositie

decomposition

[ˌdiːkɒmpəˈzɪʃən] Ndescomposición f, putrefacción f

decomposition

[ˌdiːkɒmpəˈzɪʃən] n [body, plant] → décomposition f

decomposition

n (Phys: of light) → Zerlegung f; (Chem also) → Abbau m; (= rotting)Zersetzung f, → Verfaulen nt

decomposition

[ˌdiːkɒmpəˈzɪʃn] ndecomposizione f

decompose

(diːkəmˈpouz) verb
(of vegetable or animal matter) to (cause to) decay or rot. Corpses decompose quickly in heat.
decomposition (diːkompəˈziʃən) noun
ˌdecomˈposer noun
something that causes a substance to rot or break up into simpler parts.

de·com·po·si·tion

n. descomposición. 1. disolución de una sustancia en elementos químicos;
2. descomposición de material orgánico.
References in classic literature ?
Some other remains, preserved from decomposition by the grape system, told me that the grapes were of a peculiar breed, highly medicinal in their nature, and that they were counted out and administered by the grape-doctors as methodically as if they were pills.
The uncontrollable and hopeless mass of decomposition so engendered, would have polluted the air, even if poverty and deprivation had not loaded it with their intangible impurities; the two bad sources combined made it almost insupportable.
The refuse was not wholly vegetable either, for I myself saw a shoe, a doubled-up saucepan, a black bonnet, and an umbrella, in various stages of decomposition, as I was looking out for the number I wanted.
I bargained for ninepence, and what with the roller, and opening the soda water, and shoving them heavy tables about, there was a decomposition of tissue in me to the tune of two shillings.
Thus they die in the open air; and at the end of ten days they are in a forward state of decomposition.
The high trees that were growing on the very verge of the wheel-tracks excluded the sun’s rays, unless at meridian; and the slowness of the evaporation, united with the rich mould of vegetable decomposition that covered the whole country to the depth of several inches, occasioned but an indifferent foundation for the footing of travellers.
It is frequently mixed with marl, and with marine substances in a state of decomposition.
One by one the remaining brutes stretched themselves upon the bubbling decomposition that covered the mass of bones upon the floor of their den, until but a single apt remained awake.
Stopcocks, of which one has an orifice twice the size of the other, communicate between these receptacles and a fourth one, which is called the mixture reservoir, since in it the two gases obtained by the decomposition of the water do really commingle.
Beyond a certain limit no mechanical disruption of the body could hasten the process of decomposition.
Some had eaten until their abdomens were so distended that I thought they must burst, for beside the thag there had been fully a hundred antelopes of various sizes and varied degrees of decomposition, which they had unearthed from bur-ial beneath the floors of their lairs to grace the banquet-board.
I even went the length of communicating the opinion of the surgeon consulted, that some chemical means of arresting decomposition had been used and had only partially succeeded-- and I asked her point-blank if the surgeon was right?