deconditioned


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de·con·di·tion

 (dē′kən-dĭsh′ən)
v. de·con·di·tioned, de·con·di·tion·ing, de·con·di·tions
v.tr.
1. Psychology To cause (a conditioned response) to become extinct.
2. To cause to decline from a condition of physical fitness, as through a prolonged period of inactivity or, in astronauts, through weightlessness in space.
v.intr.
To lose physical fitness.
Translations

deconditioned

adj fuera de forma
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References in periodicals archive ?
Patients who undergo revascularization can become deconditioned over time if they don't do enough walking," says Dr.
Prof Caplan said: "Following current missions to the International Space Station, astronauts return to Earth in a physiologically deconditioned state, where they have immediate access to medical support.
Jones had stated a number of his Lions arrived into the Portugal camp deconditioned and needed to be given vastly reduced training programs before it would be decided if they are fit to play.
Rehabilitation intervention with deconditioned older adults following an acute hospital admission: a systematic review.
Contract notice: managing deconditioned patients pathways.
He's deconditioned because he hasn't played a lot of football.
Another big study showed that people, after age 65, can't lift their arm because they're so deconditioned.
But don't become deconditioned through lack of exercise--keep active, walking around your home, and marching on the spot.
But many of us have become deconditioned from sitting too much, and the result is less range of motion and more pain--all because we're not as physically active as we used to be or we can be.
2) That is very good news for older bodies, especially the deconditioned ones.
If you're overweight and deconditioned and you continue to put your joint through wear and tear and just take something for the pain, you're not putting that joint in a more favorable environment.