decorative


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Related to decorative: Home decor

dec·o·ra·tive

 (dĕk′ər-ə-tĭv, -ə-rā′-)
adj.
Serving to decorate or embellish; ornamental.

dec′o·ra·tive·ly adv.
dec′o·ra·tive·ness n.

decorative

(ˈdɛkərətɪv; ˈdɛkrətɪv)
adj
serving to decorate or adorn; ornamental
ˈdecoratively adv
ˈdecorativeness n

dec•o•ra•tive

(ˈdɛk ər ə tɪv, ˈdɛk rə-, ˈdɛk əˌreɪ-)

adj.
1. serving or tending to decorate.
2. ornamental rather than functional in purpose.
[1785–95]
dec′o•ra•tive•ly, adv.
dec′o•ra•tive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.decorative - serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"
nonfunctional - not having or performing a function

decorative

Translations
زُخْرُفي، تَزْييني
dekorativníokrasný
dekorativ
dekoratív
til skrauts; skrautlegur
dekoratívny
dekoratifsüslü

decorative

[ˈdekərətɪv]
A. ADJ (in function) → de adorno, decorativo; (= pleasant) → hermoso, elegante
B. CPD decorative arts NPLartes fpl decorativas

decorative

[ˈdɛkərətɪv] adjdécoratif/ive

decorative

adjdekorativ

decorative

[ˈdɛkrətɪv] adjdecorativo/a

decorate

(ˈdekəreit) verb
1. to add some kind of ornament etc to (something) to make more beautiful, striking etc. We decorated the Christmas tree with glass balls.
2. to put paint, paper etc on the walls, ceiling and woodwork of (a room). He spent a week decorating the living-room.
3. to give a medal or badge to (someone) as a mark of honour. He was decorated for his bravery.
ˌdecoˈration noun
1. something used to decorate. Christmas decorations.
2. the act of decorating. The decoration of the house will be a long job.
ˈdecorative (-rətiv) adjective
ornamental or beautiful (especially if not useful). a decorative arrangement of flowers.
ˈdecorator noun
a person who decorates rooms, houses etc. He was a painter and decorator.
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile I am approaching a decorative old Surrey town, little more than a cluster of ripe old inns, to one of which I have much pleasure in inviting the reader to dinner.
He had to content himself with setting the man to work again on mantelpieces and other decorative stone-work for use in house property on the Trefusis estate.
A decorative object, such as a column, for instance, was placed in one of the corners and immediately produced a hall of a thousand columns; for, thanks to the mirrors, the real room was multiplied by six hexagonal rooms, each of which, in its turn, was multiplied indefinitely.
This style of painting infested the decorative art of the day, especially above door-frames, where the artist displayed his eternal Seasons, and made you, in most houses in the centre of France, abhor the odious Cupids, endlessly employed in skating, gleaning, twirling, or garlanding one another with flowers.
The old warrior himself was arranging in round balls the two grey locks of hair that were suffered to grow from the crown of his head; his earrings and spear, both well polished, lay beside him, while the highly decorative pair of shoes hung suspended from a projecting cane against the side of the house.
No; I think it was decorative art-needlework she took up.
We were standing by then in the middle of the room with its vivid colours on a black background, with its multitude of winged figures with pale limbs, with hair like halos or flames, all strangely tense in their strained, decorative attitudes.
In short, the cost of an article of furniture has at length come to be, with us, nearly the sole test of its merit in a decorative point of view - and this test, once established, has led the way to many analogous errors, readily traceable to the one primitive folly.
The yellow shoes looked as though each had half a billiard ball in the toe, and the entire tops were perforated with many diverging lines in an attempt for the decorative.
He had a curious black beard appearing only at the corners of his chin, and his large eyes were oddly set in his face like the flat decorative eyes painted in old Egyptian profiles.
The second was clearer: an old Elizabethan galley with decorative waves beneath it, but interrupted in the middle by a curious jagged rock, which was either a fault in the wood or some conventional representation of the water coming in.
Sir Harry hinted that a column, if possible, should be structural as well as decorative.