decorum


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de·co·rum

 (dĭ-kôr′əm)
n.
1. Appropriateness of behavior or conduct; propriety: "In the Ireland of the 1940's ... the stolidity of a long, empty, grave face was thought to be the height of decorum and profundity" (John McGahern).
2. decorums The conventions or requirements of polite behavior: the formalities and decorums of a military funeral.
3. The appropriateness of an element of an artistic or literary work, such as style or tone, to its particular circumstance or to the composition as a whole.

[Latin decōrum, from decōrus, becoming, handsome; see decorous.]

decorum

(dɪˈkɔːrəm)
n
1. propriety, esp in behaviour or conduct
2. a requirement of correct behaviour in polite society
[C16: from Latin: propriety]

de•co•rum

(dɪˈkɔr əm, -ˈkoʊr-)

n.
1. dignified propriety of conduct, manners, or appearance.
2. Usu., decorums. the customs and observances of polite society.
[1560–70; < Latin decōrum, decorous]

decorum

proper behavior; action that is seemly and in good taste. — decorous, adj.
See also: Behavior

Decorum

 of deans: deans collectively. See also decanter.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.decorum - propriety in manners and conduct
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
becomingness - the quality of being becoming
indecorousness, indecorum - a lack of decorum

decorum

decorum

noun
1. Conformity to recognized standards, as of conduct or appearance:
2. Socially correct behavior:
etiquette, good form, manner (used in plural), mores, propriety (also used in plural), p's and q's.
Translations
حِشْمَه، لَياقَه، ذَوْق
dobré způsoby
anstændighedetikette
tisztesség
háttprÿîi

decorum

[dɪˈkɔːrəm] Ndecoro m

decorum

[dɪˈkɔːrəm] ndécorum m, bienséance f
sense of decorum → sens m des convenances

decorum

nAnstand m, → Dekorum nt (old, form); to have a sense of decorumGefühl für Anstand haben; to behave with decorumsich mit gebührendem Anstand benehmen

decorum

[dɪˈkɔːrəm] ndecoro
out of a sense of decorum → per rispetto delle convenienze
a breach of decorum → una sconvenienza

decorous

(ˈdekərəs) adjective
(behaving in a manner which is) acceptable, especially quiet and dignified. behaving in a decorous manner.
ˈdecorously adverb
decorum (diˈkoːrəm) noun
quiet, dignified and proper behaviour. The man behaved with decorum in the old lady's presence.
References in classic literature ?
Her voice was high and rather shrill, and she often spoke with an anxious inflection, for she was exceedingly desirous that everything should go with due order and decorum.
Duncan knew enough of Indian customs to understand the reason that the fire was replenished, and why the warriors, not excepting Hawkeye, took their seats within the curl of its smoke with so much gravity and decorum.
It was not so much a better principle, as partly his natural good taste, and still more his buckramed habit of clerical decorum, that carried him safely through the latter crisis.
Shelby, "if you wish to communicate with me, you must observe something of the decorum of a gentleman.
There were no speeches, there was but little talk, there were no frivolities; the Council filled themselves gradually, steadily, but surely, with beer, and conducted themselves with sedate decorum, as became men of position, men of influence, men of manure.
Each had enough decorum to suspend further hostilities: Heathcliff placed his fists, out of temptation, in his pockets; Mrs.
With the old, be had another part to play, which, when needful, he could sustain with great decorum.
Anselmo was completely satisfied by the words of Lothario, and believed them as fully as if they had been spoken by an oracle; nevertheless he begged of him not to relinquish the undertaking, were it but for the sake of curiosity and amusement; though thenceforward he need not make use of the same earnest endeavours as before; all he wished him to do was to write some verses to her, praising her under the name of Chloris, for he himself would give her to understand that he was in love with a lady to whom he had given that name to enable him to sing her praises with the decorum due to her modesty; and if Lothario were unwilling to take the trouble of writing the verses he would compose them himself.
Any other plan would be contrary to reason, to precedent, and to decorum.
She let him do as he liked, although in the street she was offish enough to other men, refusing their familiarities partly from decorum and partly for contempt for their commonness.
I felt it very improper, for you can't go on for some years teaching etiquette and decorum to other girls without the pedantry of it biting into yourself a bit.
It is a curious thing, by the bye, for which I am quite unable to account, that these weird creatures-- the females, I mean--had in the earlier days of my stay an instinctive sense of their own repulsive clumsiness, and displayed in consequence a more than human regard for the decency and decorum of extensive costume.