dedicator


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ded·i·cate

 (dĕd′ĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. ded·i·cat·ed, ded·i·cat·ing, ded·i·cates
1. To set apart for a deity or for religious purposes; consecrate.
2. To set apart for a special use: dedicated their money to scientific research.
3. To commit (oneself) to a particular course of thought or action: dedicated ourselves to starting our own business. See Synonyms at devote.
4. To address or inscribe (a literary work, for example) to another as a mark of respect or affection.
5.
a. To open (a building, for example) to public use.
b. To show to the public for the first time: dedicate a monument.

[Middle English dedicaten, from Latin dēdicāre, dēdicāt- : dē-, de- + dicāre, to proclaim; see deik- in Indo-European roots.]

ded′i·ca′tor n.
Translations

dedicator

nWidmende(r) mf, → Zueigner(in) m(f) (geh)
References in classic literature ?
Casaubon that he had once addressed a dedication to Carp in which he had numbered that member of the animal kingdom among the viros nullo aevo perituros, a mistake which would infallibly lay the dedicator open to ridicule in the next age, and might even be chuckled over by Pike and Tench in the present.
A very strong instance of which I shall give you in this address, in which I am determined to follow the example of all other dedicators, and will consider not what my patron really deserves to have written, but what he will be best pleased to read.
Bone morphogenetic protein 4 promotes vascular smooth muscle contractility by activating microRNA-21 (miR-21), which down-regulates expression of family of dedicator of cytokinesis (DOCK) proteins.
Large deletions and point mutations involving the dedicator of cytokinesis 8 (DOCK8) in the autosomal-ecessive form of hyper-IgE syndrome.
The name of the dedicator [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; could be a short form of [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], (18) but it is possible that Spoudis may well have been the actual name.
Being a dedicator of BB, he is least concerned whether he wins or not.
Within the text of "The History of England," in contrast, the collaborative work of author and illustrator, dedicator and dedicatee, is clearly apparent.