deduction


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Related to deduction: tax deduction

de·duc·tion

 (dĭ-dŭk′shən)
n.
1. The act of deducting; subtraction.
2. An amount that is or may be deducted: tax deductions.
3. The drawing of a conclusion by reasoning; the act of deducing.
4. Logic
a. The process of reasoning in which a conclusion follows necessarily from the stated premises; inference by reasoning from the general to the specific.
b. A conclusion reached by this process.

deduction

(dɪˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. (Mathematics) the act or process of deducting or subtracting
2. (Accounting & Book-keeping) something, esp a sum of money, that is or may be deducted
3. (Logic)
a. the process of reasoning typical of mathematics and logic, whose conclusions follow necessarily from their premises
b. an argument of this type
c. the conclusion of such an argument
4. (Logic) logic
a. a systematic method of deriving conclusions that cannot be false when the premises are true, esp one amenable to formalization and study by the science of logic
b. an argument of this type. Compare induction4

de•duc•tion

(dɪˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the process of deducting; subtraction.
2. something that may be deducted.
3. the act or process of deducing.
4. something that is deduced.
5.
a. a process of reasoning in which a conclusion follows necessarily from the premises presented; inference from the general to the particular.
b. a conclusion reached by this process. Compare induction (def. 3).
[1400–50; < Latin]

de·duc·tion

(dĭ-dŭk′shən)
1. The process of reasoning in which a conclusion follows necessarily from the premises; reasoning from the general to the specific.
2. A conclusion reached by this process.
Usage The logical processes known as deduction and induction work in opposite ways. When you use deduction, you apply general principles to specific instances. Thus, using a mathematical formula to figure the volume of air that can be contained in a gymnasium is applying deduction. Similarly, you use deduction when applying a law of physics to predict the outcome of an experiment. By contrast, when you use induction, you examine a number of specific instances of something and make a generalization based on them. Thus, if you observe hundreds of examples in which a certain chemical kills plants, you might conclude by induction that the chemical is toxic to all plants. Inductive generalizations are often revised as more examples are studied and more facts are known. Certain plants that you have not tested, for instance, may turn out to be unaffected by the chemical, and you might have to revise your thinking. In this way, an inductive generalization is much like a hypothesis.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deduction - a reduction in the gross amount on which a tax is calculateddeduction - a reduction in the gross amount on which a tax is calculated; reduces taxes by the percentage fixed for the taxpayer's income bracket
tax benefit, tax break - a tax deduction that is granted in order to encourage a particular type of commercial activity
business deduction - tax write-off for expenses of doing business
exemption - a deduction allowed to a taxpayer because of his status (having certain dependents or being blind or being over 65 etc.); "additional exemptions are allowed for each dependent"
write-down, write-off - (accounting) reduction in the book value of an asset
2.deduction - an amount or percentage deducted
allowance, adjustment - an amount added or deducted on the basis of qualifying circumstances; "an allowance for profit"
trade discount - a discount from the list price of a commodity allowed by a manufacturer or wholesaler to a merchant
3.deduction - something that is inferred (deduced or entailed or implied); "his resignation had political implications"
illation, inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
4.deduction - reasoning from the general to the particular (or from cause to effect)
abstract thought, logical thinking, reasoning - thinking that is coherent and logical
syllogism - deductive reasoning in which a conclusion is derived from two premises
5.deduction - the act of subtracting (removing a part from the whole); "he complained about the subtraction of money from their paychecks"
reduction, step-down, diminution, decrease - the act of decreasing or reducing something
bite - a portion removed from the whole; "the government's weekly bite from my paycheck"
withholding - the act of deducting from an employee's salary
6.deduction - the act of reducing the selling price of merchandisededuction - the act of reducing the selling price of merchandise
reduction, step-down, diminution, decrease - the act of decreasing or reducing something

deduction

noun
1. conclusion, finding, verdict, judgment, assumption, inference, corollary It was a pretty astute deduction.
2. reasoning, thinking, thought, reason, analysis, logic, cogitation, ratiocination 'How did you guess?' 'Deduction,' he replied.
3. discount, reduction, cut, concession, allowance, decrease, rebate, diminution your gross income, before tax and insurance deductions
4. subtraction, reduction, allowance, concession the deduction of tax at 20%

deduction

noun
1. An amount deducted:
2. A position arrived at by reasoning from premises or general principles:
Translations
إستِخْلاص، إسْتِنْتاجخَصْم، حَسْمنَتيجَه
dedukcesrážka
fradragslutningudledelseudledning
deduktiopäätelmäpäättelyvähennys
afleiîslafrádráttur
dedukcia
avdraghärledningslutledningslutsats

deduction

[dɪˈdʌkʃən] N
1. (= inference) → deducción f, conclusión f
what are your deductions?¿cuáles son sus conclusiones?
2. (= act of deducting) → deducción f; (= amount deducted) → descuento m
tax deductionsdesgravaciones fpl fiscales, deducciones fpl fiscales

deduction

[dɪˈdʌkʃən] n
[points, amount] → déduction f
[tax, interest] → prélèvement m, retenue f
(amount subtracted)prélèvement m
(= conclusion) → déduction f, conclusion f

deduction

n
(= act of deducting)Abziehen nt, → Abzug m; (= sth deducted, from price) → Nachlass m (→ from für, auf +acc); (from wage) → Abzug m
(= act of deducing)Folgern nt, → Folgerung f; (= sth deduced)(Schluss)folgerung f; (Logic) → Deduktion f; by a process of deductiondurch Folgern

deduction

[dɪˈdʌkʃn] n
a. (inference) → deduzione f
b. (subtraction) → detrazione f; (from wages) → trattenuta

deduce

(diˈdjuːs) verb
to work out from facts one knows or guesses. From the height of the sun I deduced that it was about ten o'clock.
deduction (diˈdakʃən) noun
1. the act of deducing.
2. something that has been deduced. Is this deduction accurate?

deduct

(diˈdakt) verb
to subtract; to take away. They deducted the expenses from his salary.
deˈduction (-ʃən) noun
something that has been deducted. There were a lot of deductions from my salary this month.

de·duc·tion

n. deducción.
References in classic literature ?
For, thought Ahab, while even the highest earthly felicities ever have a certain unsignifying pettiness lurking in them, but, at bottom, all heart-woes, a mystic significance, and, in some men, an archangelic grandeur; so do their diligent tracings-out not belie the obvious deduction.
That the executive head of a nation should be a person of lofty character and extraordinary ability, was manifest and indisputable; that none but the Deity could select that head unerr- ingly, was also manifest and indisputable; that the Deity ought to make that selection, then, was likewise manifest and indisputable; consequently, that He does make it, as claimed, was an unavoidable deduction.
This hog was always wallowing there, and as he was the only hog we saw, his frequent repetition, together with his unvarying similarity to himself, finally caused me to reflect that he must be the same hog, and this led me to the deduction that this must be the same spring, also--which indeed it was.
A real injury to the childrena most mortifying change, and material loss to them all;a very great deduction from her father's daily comfortand, as to herself, she could not at all endure the idea of Jane Fairfax at Donwell Abbey.
The long chains of simple and easy reasonings by means of which geometers are accustomed to reach the conclusions of their most difficult demonstrations, had led me to imagine that all things, to the knowledge of which man is competent, are mutually connected in the same way, and that there is nothing so far removed from us as to be beyond our reach, or so hidden that we cannot discover it, provided only we abstain from accepting the false for the true, and always preserve in our thoughts the order necessary for the deduction of one truth from another.
If we balance a proper deduction from one side against that which it is supposed ought to be made from the other, the proportion may still be considered as holding good.
They might therefore, with great propriety, be considered as something more than a mere deduction from the real representatives of the nation.
And what is your deduction from this compensation, sir?
See if a deduction cannot be made from this charge.
This joke satisfied some of those who had resisted Monk's first deduction drawn from the neighborhood of Lambert's army; the number of the dissentients diminished greatly; the guard took their posts, the patrols began, and the general continued his frugal repast beneath his open tent.
Hence, you see, my double deduction that you had been out in vile weather, and that you had a particularly malignant boot-slitting specimen of the London slavey.
I will give you the steps of deduction presently, if you want to listen to them; but I did not reach the truth of this by steps of deduction.