deep-sky object


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deep-sky object

(dēp′skī′)
n.
Any of various celestial objects, including nebulae, star clusters, and galaxies, that are diffuse and very distant, and therefore faint, usually observable only by means of a telescope.
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2 -- 3 -- color) Astronomy guide Daniel Manrique, above, trains a telescope on a deep-sky object at the Skywatcher's Inn, where the Galaxy room, above left, plays up the outer space theme.
Many resources for beginners and those at intermediate level are available from the ASSA website, including the Southern Star Wheel planisphere, ConCards (constellation and deep-sky object finder charts) and the comprehensive Deepsky Observer's Companion tutorial.
Many resources for beginners and those at intermediate level are available from the Section, including the Southern Star Wheel planisphere, ConCards (constellation and deep-sky object finder charts) and the comprehensive Deepsky Observer's Companion tutorial.
The object is one of a hundred deep-sky object discovered in the 1860s by Truman Henry Safford at Dearborn Observatory in Chicago.
deep-sky objects, with a hand-picked selection of the finest southern specimens;
The constellation is very popular, especially with amateur astronomers who observe the depth of its deep-sky objects.
25-inch optical tube, NexStar Evolution offers impressive views of even faint, deep-sky objects.
This will allow you to observe many more stars in the sky, the varying colours of the stars and the chance to see much fainter, deep-sky objects.
The book consists of a descriptive and historical section, discussing the charting of the skies, telescopic astronomy, deep-sky objects (with the welcome inclusion of exoplanets: their nature and discovery) and the celestial sphere; an observing section, with attractive colour-coded circumpolar and seasonal charts for the whole world; and a solar system section, full of up-to-date facts about atmospheric effects (including high-altitude phenomena such as aurorae, meteors and noctilucent clouds), the Moon, planets and other bodies of the Sun's family.
With a simple pair of binoculars, you can see many of the deep-sky objects we look at with telescopes," he says.
Tour guides are experienced amateur astronomers who help identify deep-sky objects - bright stars and constellations, star clusters, nebulas and galaxies - as well as the moon and planets.
The author, a physician and photographer whose images routinely appear in sky and Telescope magazine, provides vivid images and abundant facts about more than 120 deep-sky objects.