deerlike

deerlike

(ˈdɪəˌlaɪk)
adj
(Animals) resembling a deer
References in periodicals archive ?
Other readers had suggestions: "A dried strip from the long tendon of any deerlike animal would have been both very strong and very thin," wrote Robert Stenton.
Spielvogel: "'I rocked her, I teased her, I made her laugh, for the first time I said, 'I love you too, my baby', but of course it couldn't have been clearer to me that despite all her many qualities and charms--her devotion, her beauty, her deerlike grace, her place in American history-- there never could be any 'love' in me for The Pilgrim.
But it is curiosity merely--a timid, deerlike curiosity.
Herds of stately Shorthorns and deerlike Alderneys grazed in the fertile fields.
No doubt cast partly for her fresh, open face and large, deerlike eyes, newcomer Sophie Quinton plays Isabelle, a nursing student doing residency at a modern, proper-looking hospital where her older cousin, Veronique (Catherine Jacob) works.
An alert and graceful carriage gives them a deerlike appearance.
It's terrific - smooth, wide-open, fast, tons of fun,'' said mountain biker Brett Ross of Agoura Hills, who remembers a time years ago when the best access to the upper stretches of Zuma Canyon was via a tiny deerlike trail scratched into the bedrock.
The okapi shares the rain forest with chimpanzees, forest elephants, giant hogs, deerlike bongos, and the deadly gaboon viper.
Chapter by chapter, the author recounts how fish conquered the land, how reptiles evolved to produce birds and how fox-sized, deerlike creatures returned to the seas to become whales.
New fossils of Indohyus, a genus previously known only from some teeth and a jawbone fragment, led researchers to identify these deerlike creatures as the closest known relatives of primitive whales.
In the past decade, the Annamite area has yielded stunning finds--the deerlike giant muntjac, the bovine saola, the Vietnam warty pig--notes Joshua Ginsberg of the Asia Program of the Wildlife Conservation Society, based at the Bronx Zoo.
The fossil record shows that these creatures' common ancestor, a small, deerlike animal, branched off from nonruminants 40 million years ago by developing the rumen, a stomach chamber that holds cellulose-chomping bacteria.