defamation


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def·a·ma·tion

 (dĕf′ə-mā′shən)
n.
The act of defaming; calumny, slander, or libel.

de·fam′a·to′ry (dĭ-făm′ə-tôr′ē) adj.

defamation

(ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. (Law) law the injuring of a person's good name or reputation. Compare libel, slander
2. (Law) the act of defaming or state of being defamed

def•a•ma•tion

(ˌdɛf əˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of defaming, esp. unjustified injury to another's reputation, as by slander or libel.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Medieval Latin]
de•fam•a•to•ry (dɪˈfæm əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actionsdefamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
assassination, blackwash, character assassination - an attack intended to ruin someone's reputation
malignment, smear, vilification - slanderous defamation
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
slander - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
name calling, names - verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument; "sticks and stones may break my bones but names can never hurt me"
epithet, name - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
2.defamation - an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
attack - strong criticism; "he published an unexpected attack on my work"

defamation

defamation

noun
The expression of injurious, malicious statements about someone:
Law: libel.
Translations
pomluva
ærekrenkelseærekrenking

defamation

[ˌdefəˈmeɪʃən] Ndifamación f

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən] ndiffamation f
defamation of character → diffamation f

defamation

nDiffamierung f, → Verleumdung f; defamation of characterRufmord m

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃn] n (frm) → diffamazione f
References in classic literature ?
Josephs, partly from benevolence, and partly from a vague fear that Smilash might at any moment take an action against him for defamation of character, said he had no doubt that he was a very cheap workman, and that it would be a charity to give him some little job to encourage him.
So curious, that I think you are running a great risk of a prosecution for defamation of character.
His indignant countrymen actually caused him to be prosecuted in the native courts, on a charge nearly equivalent to what we term defamation of character; but the old fellow persisting in his assertion, and no invalidating proof being adduced, the plaintiffs were cast in the suit, and the cannibal reputation of the defendant firmly established.
It seems to me that if what he says is false, the proper name for it is calumny, defamation of character; and such a slanderer deserves the thrashing.
But some day he will know what is the meaning of defamation, and if he ever does, he will forgive me.
The defamation claim in the case of In Re: Philadelphia Newspapers (83) arose out of the bankruptcy proceedings of a corporate group that includes The Philadelphia Inquirer newspaper.
Summary: Energy Minister Gebran Bassil announced Monday that his lawyers would sue several media outlets and journalists for defamation, the Central News Agency reported.
Defamation law and social attitudes; ordinary unreasonable people.
MAJOR reforms of the libel laws, which will see would-be claimants having to show they have suffered serious harm to their reputations, or are likely to do so, before they can take a defamation case forward, have been unveiled in a new Defamation Bill.
This Article explores the recent decisions by the United Nations ("UN") Human Rights Council and General Assembly to adopt consensus resolutions aimed at "combating intolerance, negative stereotyping and stigmatization of and discrimination, incitement to violence and violence against, persons based on religion or belief" These resolutions represent an effort to move past a decade's worth of contentious roll call votes in favor of prohibiting defamation of religion within the international human rights framework.
Confirmation that a claim for damages as a result of alleged defamation had been made against Oakley and publishers, Hodder Headline, came in a statement issued last night by Leeds-based solicitors McCormick.
As interesting as Waddams' study is, one cannot help regretting that he did not pursue the question of how formal defamation sui ts compared to popular Skimmington Rides and charivari as ways of drawing and policing social boundaries.