defamation

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Related to defamations: slandered

def·a·ma·tion

 (dĕf′ə-mā′shən)
n.
The act of defaming; calumny, slander, or libel.

de·fam′a·to′ry (dĭ-făm′ə-tôr′ē) adj.

defamation

(ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən)
n
1. (Law) law the injuring of a person's good name or reputation. Compare libel, slander
2. (Law) the act of defaming or state of being defamed

def•a•ma•tion

(ˌdɛf əˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
the act of defaming, esp. unjustified injury to another's reputation, as by slander or libel.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Medieval Latin]
de•fam•a•to•ry (dɪˈfæm əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actionsdefamation - a false accusation of an offense or a malicious misrepresentation of someone's words or actions
derogation, disparagement, depreciation - a communication that belittles somebody or something
assassination, blackwash, character assassination - an attack intended to ruin someone's reputation
malignment, smear, vilification - slanderous defamation
libel - a false and malicious publication printed for the purpose of defaming a living person
slander - words falsely spoken that damage the reputation of another
name calling, names - verbal abuse; a crude substitute for argument; "sticks and stones may break my bones but names can never hurt me"
epithet, name - a defamatory or abusive word or phrase
2.defamation - an abusive attack on a person's character or good name
attack - strong criticism; "he published an unexpected attack on my work"

defamation

defamation

noun
The expression of injurious, malicious statements about someone:
Law: libel.
Translations
pomluva
ærekrenkelseærekrenking

defamation

[ˌdefəˈmeɪʃən] Ndifamación f

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃən] ndiffamation f
defamation of character → diffamation f

defamation

nDiffamierung f, → Verleumdung f; defamation of characterRufmord m

defamation

[ˌdɛfəˈmeɪʃn] n (frm) → diffamazione f
References in classic literature ?
Josephs, partly from benevolence, and partly from a vague fear that Smilash might at any moment take an action against him for defamation of character, said he had no doubt that he was a very cheap workman, and that it would be a charity to give him some little job to encourage him.
His indignant countrymen actually caused him to be prosecuted in the native courts, on a charge nearly equivalent to what we term defamation of character; but the old fellow persisting in his assertion, and no invalidating proof being adduced, the plaintiffs were cast in the suit, and the cannibal reputation of the defendant firmly established.
So curious, that I think you are running a great risk of a prosecution for defamation of character.
But some day he will know what is the meaning of defamation, and if he ever does, he will forgive me.
It seems to me that if what he says is false, the proper name for it is calumny, defamation of character; and such a slanderer deserves the thrashing.
The only thing I can recall now, is that I had been served with a summons issued by the Larnaca District Court for alleged defamations, which due to my heavy schedule and frequent travel abroad, and not due to negligence or disrespect towards the court or the plaintiff, but rather by human mistake, was misplaced and mixed in with other documents in my office, as I discovered today, after the announcement and my absence in court," Phedonos said.
Phedonos said he only learnt of the court's ruling for defamation damages from the media and that the ruling was passed in absentia.
The court said that "in determining whether post-termination defamations such as the ones here fall within an ERP [employment-related practices] exclusion, courts generally inquire whether the statement was made in the context of employment, and whether the statement's content describes the employee's performance.
While Abraham Lincoln may have said, "Truth is generally the best vindication against slander," many also gain some satisfaction by filing a defamation suit.
He claimed that in order to be considered employment-related, defamation must meet two standards: (1) the author of the defamation must be the plaintiff's superior -- defamation by a peer does not constitute employment-related defamation; and (2) the subject of the defamation must be the plaintiff's performance during the employment -- an insult by a former supervisor does not constitute employment-related defamation.
INTRODUCTION: THE DEFAMATION OF THE RESTATEMENT (SECOND) OF CONFLICT OF LAWS IN CYBERSPACE
While many opponents criticize traditional choice-of-law regimes in cyber-disputes arising out of contracts, trademark infringement, and other areas of law, much of the criticism focuses on the law of defamation in cyberspace, or "cyber-defamation".