defection


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de·fect

 (dē′fĕkt′, dĭ-fĕkt′)
n.
An imperfection or lack that causes inadequacy or failure; a shortcoming or deficiency. See Synonyms at blemish.
intr.v. (dĭ-fĕkt′) de·fect·ed, de·fect·ing, de·fects
1. To disown allegiance to one's country and take up residence in another: a Soviet citizen who defected to Israel.
2. To abandon a position or association, often to join an opposing group: defected from the party over the issue of free trade.

[Middle English, from Latin dēfectus, failure, want, from past participle of dēficere, to desert, be wanting : dē-, de- + facere, to do; see dhē- in Indo-European roots.]

de·fec′tion n.
de·fec′tor n.

defection

(dɪˈfɛkʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of defecting
2. abandonment of duty, allegiance, principles, etc; backsliding
3. another word for defect1, defect2

de•fec•tion

(dɪˈfɛk ʃən)

n.
desertion from allegiance, loyalty, duty, or the like; apostasy.
[1535–45; < Latin dēfectiō]

defection

the act of abandoning a person or cause to which one has an obligation or allegiance, especially accompanied by flight from one’s country. — defector, defectionist, n.
See also: Allegiance
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defection - withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibilitydefection - withdrawing support or help despite allegiance or responsibility; "his abandonment of his wife and children left them penniless"
withdrawal - the act of withdrawing; "the withdrawal of French troops from Vietnam"
abscondment, decampment - the act of running away secretly (as to avoid arrest)
absence without leave, unauthorized absence - unauthorized military absence
deviationism - ideological defection from the party line (especially from orthodox communism)
2.defection - the state of having rejected your religious beliefs or your political party or a cause (often in favor of opposing beliefs or causes)
rejection - the state of being rejected

defection

noun desertion, revolt, rebellion, abandonment, dereliction, backsliding, apostasy the defection of at least sixteen deputies

defection

noun
An instance of defecting from or abandoning a cause:
Translations
هَرب، تَخَلٍّ عن حِزْب، إرتِداد
odpadnutízběhnutí
afhopning
disszidálás
liîhlaup
odpadnutie
ayrılmakarşı tarafa geçme

defection

[dɪˈfekʃən] N (Pol) (to different country) → deserción f; (to different party) → cambio m de filas, defección f (frm)

defection

[dɪˈfɛkʃən] n (to another party)défection f; (to another team)défection m; (to another country)défection f

defection

n (Pol) → Überlaufen nt; (fig)Abtrünnigkeit f, → Abfall m

defection

[dɪˈfɛkʃn] n (from country) → fuga; (from political party) → defezione f

defect

(ˈdiːfekt) noun
a fault or flaw. It was a basic defect in her character; a defect in the china.
(diˈfekt) verb
to leave a country, political party etc to go and join another; to desert. He defected to the West.
deˈfection (-ʃən) noun
(an act of) desertion.
deˈfective (-tiv) adjective
having a fault or flaw. a defective machine; He is mentally defective.
References in classic literature ?
The French had accounted for this unexpected defection on the part of their ally in various ways.
Happily, their father, completely absorbed in a practical, scientific, and approving contemplation of the topography and material resources of the scene of his future labors, had no time to notice their defection.
It was at this point, gentlemen, that enraged by the defection of seven of his former associates, and stung by the mocking voice that had last hailed him, and maddened by his long entombment in a place as black as the bowels of despair; it was then that Steelkilt proposed to the two Canallers, thus far apparently of one mind with him, to burst out of their hole at the next summoning of the garrison; and armed with their keen mincing knives (long, crescentic, heavy implements with a handle at each end) run a muck from the bowsprit to the taffrail; and if by any devilishness of desperation possible, seize the ship.
I now knew that while theoretically a prisoner I was virtually free, and I hastened to regain the city limits before the defection of Woola could be discovered by his erstwhile masters.
Kitty and Lydia take his defection much more to heart than I do.
Lady Susan was far from intending such a conquest, and on finding how warmly Miss Mainwaring resented her lover's defection, determined, in spite of Mr.
A fat major skirted a bush, puffing and falling out of step; a soldier who had fallen behind, his face showing alarm at his defection, ran at a trot, panting to catch up with his company.
The Sarians, under Ghak the Hairy One, and the Amozites under Dacor the Strong One, Dian's brother, had fallen out over my supposed defection, for Ghak would not believe that I had thus treacher-ously deceived and deserted them.
He noted with surprise the absence of Taglat, whom he had expected to find awaiting him outside the tent of Achmet Zek; but, accustomed as he was to the unreliability of apes, he gave no serious attention to the present defection of his surly companion.
He had come alone for two very excellent reasons, the first of which was that thus none might note his terror-stricken state nor his defection should he fail at the last moment, and the other was that should he accomplish the thing alone or be able to make his chiefs believe that he had, the credit would be far greater than were he to be accompanied by warriors.
His men recognized his voice immediately and as they knew nothing of the defection of any of their fellows, turned the boat's prow toward shore without waiting for the command from von Horn.
It was about this time that a slight defection arose on the part of Lop-Ear.