defensative

defensative

(dɪˈfɛnsətɪv)
n
a thing that offers protection or defence, esp a dressing, etc, that protects against infection or injury
adj
1. (Military) having the ability to protect or defend
2. having been made or said in order to justify or defend something
References in periodicals archive ?
a rebuttal of another's position: censure, exception, caveat, counterpoison, reply, antidote, answer, justification, eviction, replication, opposition, warning, defence, justification, apology, defensative, remedy, remonstrance, refutation, protestation, confutation, recovery, manuduction.
Simon Kellwaye, A Defensative agaynst the Plague (London: John Windett, 1593) [STC 14917], sig.
In 1583, these were so widespread and provocative that Henry Howard dedicated a three-hundred-page tome to Sir Francis Walsingham entitled A Defensative agaynst the Poyson of Supposed Prophecies, admonishing him to curtail the use of prophecy in the realm.
This was quite an advance from what More knew, a defensative against plague at its most practical, available, and conducive to national stability.
Both Dove and Geveren cited Sibylline prophecies, and even Henry Howard, whose book, A defensative against the poyson of supposed Prophesies, attacked the vogue for prophetical and astrological speculation exemplified by the writings of Richard Harvey and others, grudgingly acknowledged the patristic testimony in the Sibyls' favour and concluded that on this account, if no other, 'we should admitte them .
In the light of the new material presented here, I would add to this a suggestion that Nashe began to make notes on Henry Howard's A Defensative against the Poison of Supposed Prophecies (1583) while staying with Sir Robert Cotton at Conington; at the time when he revised and completed the work for publication he was either in the Isle of Wight or London, and no longer had access to Cotton's copy of the Definsative, only to his own notes.