defer


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Related to defer: differ

de·fer 1

 (dĭ-fûr′)
intr.v. de·ferred, de·fer·ring, de·fers
1. To put off; postpone.
2. To postpone the induction of (one eligible for the military draft).

[Middle English differren, to postpone, differ; see differ.]

de·fer′ra·ble adj.
de·fer′rer n.
Synonyms: defer1, postpone, shelve, suspend
These verbs mean to put off until a later time: deferred paying the bills; postponing our trip; shelved the issue; suspending train service.

de·fer 2

 (dĭ-fûr′)
v. de·ferred, de·fer·ring, de·fers
v.intr.
To submit to the wish or decision of another, as in recognition of authority. See Synonyms at yield.
v.tr.
To commit or entrust to another: The principal deferred the decision to the school board.

[Middle English deferen, from Old French deferer, from Latin dēferre, to carry away, refer to : dē-, de- + ferre, to carry; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

de·fer′rer n.

defer

(dɪˈfɜː)
vb, -fers, -ferring or -ferred
(tr) to delay or cause to be delayed until a future time; postpone
[C14: from Old French differer to be different, postpone; see differ]
deˈferrable, deˈferable adj
deˈferrer n

defer

(dɪˈfɜː)
vb, -fers, -ferring or -ferred
(foll by: to) to yield (to) or comply (with) the wishes or judgments of another: I defer to your superior knowledge.
[C15: from Latin dēferre, literally: to bear down, from de- + ferre to bear]

de•fer1

(dɪˈfɜr)

v.t. -ferred, -fer•ring.
1. to postpone; delay.
2. to exempt temporarily from induction into military service.
[1325–75; Middle English deferren, variant of differren to differ]
de•fer′rer, n.
syn: defer, delay, postpone imply keeping something from occurring until a future time. To defer is to decide to do something at a more convenient time in the future; it often suggests avoidance: to defer making a payment. delay is sometimes equivalent to defer, but it usu. suggests a hindrance or dilatory tactic: Completion of the work was deferred by bad weather. To postpone is to put off to a particular time in the future, often to wait for new information or developments: to postpone a trial.

de•fer2

(dɪˈfɜr)

v. -ferred, -fer•ring. v.i.
1. to yield respectfully in judgment or opinion.
v.t.
2. to submit for decision; refer.
[1400–50; late Middle English deferren < Latin dēferre to carry from or down, report, accuse]

defer


Past participle: deferred
Gerund: deferring

Imperative
defer
defer
Present
I defer
you defer
he/she/it defers
we defer
you defer
they defer
Preterite
I deferred
you deferred
he/she/it deferred
we deferred
you deferred
they deferred
Present Continuous
I am deferring
you are deferring
he/she/it is deferring
we are deferring
you are deferring
they are deferring
Present Perfect
I have deferred
you have deferred
he/she/it has deferred
we have deferred
you have deferred
they have deferred
Past Continuous
I was deferring
you were deferring
he/she/it was deferring
we were deferring
you were deferring
they were deferring
Past Perfect
I had deferred
you had deferred
he/she/it had deferred
we had deferred
you had deferred
they had deferred
Future
I will defer
you will defer
he/she/it will defer
we will defer
you will defer
they will defer
Future Perfect
I will have deferred
you will have deferred
he/she/it will have deferred
we will have deferred
you will have deferred
they will have deferred
Future Continuous
I will be deferring
you will be deferring
he/she/it will be deferring
we will be deferring
you will be deferring
they will be deferring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been deferring
you have been deferring
he/she/it has been deferring
we have been deferring
you have been deferring
they have been deferring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been deferring
you will have been deferring
he/she/it will have been deferring
we will have been deferring
you will have been deferring
they will have been deferring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been deferring
you had been deferring
he/she/it had been deferring
we had been deferring
you had been deferring
they had been deferring
Conditional
I would defer
you would defer
he/she/it would defer
we would defer
you would defer
they would defer
Past Conditional
I would have deferred
you would have deferred
he/she/it would have deferred
we would have deferred
you would have deferred
they would have deferred
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.defer - hold back to a later time; "let's postpone the exam"
delay - act later than planned, scheduled, or required; "Don't delay your application to graduate school or else it won't be considered"
call - stop or postpone because of adverse conditions, such as bad weather; "call a football game"
hold - stop dealing with; "hold all calls to the President's office while he is in a meeting"
suspend - render temporarily ineffective; "the prison sentence was suspended"
probate - put a convicted person on probation by suspending his sentence
reprieve, respite - postpone the punishment of a convicted criminal, such as an execution
2.defer - yield to another's wish or opinion; "The government bowed to the military pressure"
buckle under, knuckle under, succumb, give in, yield - consent reluctantly

defer

verb postpone, delay, put off, suspend, shelve, set aside, adjourn, hold over, procrastinate, put on ice (informal), put on the back burner (informal), protract, take a rain check on (U.S. & Canad. informal), prorogue Customers often defer payment for as long as possible.

defer 1

verb
To put off until a later time:
Informal: wait.
Idiom: put on ice.

defer 2

verb
To conform to the will or judgment of another, especially out of respect or courtesy:
Translations
يُؤَجِّل، يُرْجِئ، يُمْهِليُذْعِن،يَنزِل عِنْدَ إرادَة
odložitpodrobit se
bøje sig forudsætteudskyde
alistualykätämukautua
elhalasztenged
frestalúta, fara eftir
atliktizturēties ar cieņunovilcinātpiekāpties

defer

1 [dɪˈfɜːʳ] VT
1. (= postpone) [+ meeting, business] → posponer, diferir; [+ payment] → aplazar, diferir, postergar (LAm)
2. (Mil) [+ conscript] → dar una prórroga a
his military service was deferredle concedieron una prórroga militar

defer

2 [dɪˈfɜːʳ] VI (= submit) to defer to sthdeferir a algo (frm)
in this I defer to youa este respecto defiero a su opinión (frm), a este respecto me adhiero a su opinión
to defer to sb's (greater) knowledgedeferir a los (mayores) conocimientos de algn (frm)

defer

[dɪˈfɜːr]
vt
(= postpone) [+ payment] → différer, remettre à plus tard
vi (= submit) to defer to sb → déférer à qn, s'en remettre à qn

defer

1
vt (= delay)verschieben; event alsoverlegen; to defer doing somethinges verschieben, etw zu tun

defer

2
vi (= submit) to defer to somebodysich jdm beugen or fügen; to defer to somebody’s wishessich jds Wünschen (dat)fügen

defer

[dɪˈfɜːʳ]
1. vt (postpone) → rimandare, rinviare (Law) (case) → aggiornare
2. vi (submit) to defer to sb/sthrimettersi a qn/qc
to defer to sb's (greater) knowledge → rimettersi alla scienza di qn

defer1

(diˈfəː) past tense, past participle deˈferred verb
to put off to another time. They can defer their departure.

defer2

(diˈfə) past tense, past participle deˈferred verb
(with to) to act according to the wishes or opinions of another or the orders of authority. I defer to your greater knowledge of the matter.
deference (ˈdefərəns) noun
1. willingness to consider the wishes etc of others. He always treats his mother with deference.
2. the act of deferring.
in deference to
showing respct for. I let him speak first, in deference to his authority.
deˈferment, deˈferral noun
1. delaying; postponement.
2. officially sanctioned postponement of compulsory military service. draft deferment for college students.
References in classic literature ?
Before the autumn was over, she began to treat me more like an equal and to defer to me in other things than reading lessons.
It thus occurred that one day the two girls, on their way to the main street for an hour's shopping at the Villa de Paris and Variety Store, were stopped by Dick Mattingly a few yards from their house, with the remark that, as the county election was then in progress, it would be advisable for them to defer their intention for a few hours.
Anything that would take her out of the grievous present, and interpose human beings betwixt herself and what was nearest to her,--whatever would defer for an instant the inevitable errand on which she was bound,--all such impediments were welcome.
He could do what he liked, with all his cleverness to help him, so long as I should continue to defer to the old tradition of the criminality of those caretakers of the young who minister to superstitions and fears.
He resolved that nobody should be witness of his encounter with Tom; and determined, if he could not subdue him by bullying, to defer his vengeance, to be wreaked in a more convenient season.
As it was late, he would ask leave to defer the examination of his three witnesses until the next morning.
Woodhouse, who had previously made up his mind to walk out, was persuaded by his daughter not to defer it, and was induced by the entreaties of both, though against the scruples of his own civility, to leave Mr.
Her eagerness to be gone from Norland was preserved from diminution by the evident satisfaction of her daughter-in-law in the prospect of her removal; a satisfaction which was but feebly attempted to be concealed under a cold invitation to her to defer her departure.
It required some courage to disturb so interesting a party; my errand, however, was one I could not defer, so I approached the master where he stood at Miss Ingram's side.
She would not hear of staying a second longer: in truth, I felt rather disposed to defer the sequel of her narrative myself.
They will understand, and you will understand, the vital importance I attach to this interview when I tell you that I have arranged to defer to it all other business claims on me; and that I hold myself in readiness to obey your summons at any hour of the day or night.
Allow me to say that I fully defer to the reasonable character of that inquiry, and proceed to develop it; premising that it is not an object of a pecuniary nature.