defile


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de·file 1

 (dĭ-fīl′)
tr.v. de·filed, de·fil·ing, de·files
1. To make filthy or dirty; pollute: defile a river with sewage.
2. To debase the pureness or excellence of; corrupt: a country landscape that was defiled by urban sprawl.
3. To profane or sully (a reputation, for example).
4. To make unclean or unfit for ceremonial use; desecrate: defile a temple.
5. To have sexual intercourse with (a woman who is a virgin).

[Middle English defilen, alteration (influenced by filen, to befoul, from Old English fȳlan; see pū̆- in Indo-European roots) of defoulen, to trample on, abuse, pollute, from Old French defouler, to trample, full cloth : de-, de- + fouler, to trample, beat down; see full2.]

de·file′ment n.
de·fil′er n.

de·file 2

 (dĭ-fīl′)
intr.v. de·filed, de·fil·ing, de·files
To move in single file or in files or columns: The soldiers defiled from the fort, arms raised in surrender.
n.
1. A narrow gorge or pass that restricts lateral movement, as of troops.
2. A march in a line.

[French défiler : dé-, away, off (from Old French de-; see de-) + file, line, file (from Old French filer, to spin thread, march in line; see file1). N., from French défilé, from past participle of défiler.]

defile

(dɪˈfaɪl)
vb (tr)
1. to make foul or dirty; pollute
2. to tarnish or sully the brightness of; taint; corrupt
3. to damage or sully (someone's good name, reputation, etc)
4. to make unfit for ceremonial use; desecrate
5. to violate the chastity of
[C14: from earlier defoilen (influenced by filen to file3), from Old French defouler to trample underfoot, abuse, from de- + fouler to tread upon; see full2]
deˈfilement n
deˈfiler n

defile

(ˈdiːfaɪl; dɪˈfaɪl)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a narrow pass or gorge, esp one between two mountains
2. (Military) a single file of soldiers, etc
vb
(Military) chiefly military to march or cause to march in single file
[C17: from French défilé, from défiler to file off, from filer to march in a column, from Old French: to spin, from fil thread, from Latin fīlum]

de•file1

(dɪˈfaɪl)

v.t. -filed, -fil•ing.
1. to make foul, dirty, or unclean.
2. to violate the chastity of.
3. to desecrate.
4. to sully, as a person's reputation.
[1275–1325; < Old French defouler to trample on, violate]
de•file′ment, n.
de•fil′er, n.
de•fil′ing•ly, adv.

de•file2

(dɪˈfaɪl, ˈdi faɪl)

n., v. -filed, -fil•ing. n.
1. a narrow passage, esp. between mountains.
v.i.
2. to march in a line or by files.
[1675–85; < French défilé, n. use of past participle of défiler to file off; see defilade]

defile


Past participle: defiled
Gerund: defiling

Imperative
defile
defile
Present
I defile
you defile
he/she/it defiles
we defile
you defile
they defile
Preterite
I defiled
you defiled
he/she/it defiled
we defiled
you defiled
they defiled
Present Continuous
I am defiling
you are defiling
he/she/it is defiling
we are defiling
you are defiling
they are defiling
Present Perfect
I have defiled
you have defiled
he/she/it has defiled
we have defiled
you have defiled
they have defiled
Past Continuous
I was defiling
you were defiling
he/she/it was defiling
we were defiling
you were defiling
they were defiling
Past Perfect
I had defiled
you had defiled
he/she/it had defiled
we had defiled
you had defiled
they had defiled
Future
I will defile
you will defile
he/she/it will defile
we will defile
you will defile
they will defile
Future Perfect
I will have defiled
you will have defiled
he/she/it will have defiled
we will have defiled
you will have defiled
they will have defiled
Future Continuous
I will be defiling
you will be defiling
he/she/it will be defiling
we will be defiling
you will be defiling
they will be defiling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been defiling
you have been defiling
he/she/it has been defiling
we have been defiling
you have been defiling
they have been defiling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been defiling
you will have been defiling
he/she/it will have been defiling
we will have been defiling
you will have been defiling
they will have been defiling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been defiling
you had been defiling
he/she/it had been defiling
we had been defiling
you had been defiling
they had been defiling
Conditional
I would defile
you would defile
he/she/it would defile
we would defile
you would defile
they would defile
Past Conditional
I would have defiled
you would have defiled
he/she/it would have defiled
we would have defiled
you would have defiled
they would have defiled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.defile - a narrow pass (especially one between mountains)defile - a narrow pass (especially one between mountains)
mountain pass, notch, pass - the location in a range of mountains of a geological formation that is lower than the surrounding peaks; "we got through the pass before it started to snow"
Verb1.defile - place under suspicion or cast doubt upon; "sully someone's reputation"
mar, deflower, impair, vitiate, spoil - make imperfect; "nothing marred her beauty"
2.defile - make dirty or spotty, as by exposure to air; also used metaphorically; "The silver was tarnished by the long exposure to the air"; "Her reputation was sullied after the affair with a married man"
blob, fleck, blot, spot - make a spot or mark onto; "The wine spotted the tablecloth"
darken - tarnish or stain; "a scandal that darkened the family's good name"
3.defile - spot, stain, or pollutedefile - spot, stain, or pollute; "The townspeople defiled the river by emptying raw sewage into it"
attaint, disgrace, dishonor, dishonour, shame - bring shame or dishonor upon; "he dishonored his family by committing a serious crime"

defile

verb
1. degrade, stain, disgrace, sully, debase, dishonour, besmirch, smirch He felt his father's memory had been defiled by the article.
2. desecrate, violate, contaminate, abuse, pollute, profane, dishonour, despoil, treat sacrilegiously Who gave you permission to defile this sacred place?
3. dirty, soil, contaminate, smear, pollute, taint, tarnish, make foul, smirch, befoul piles of old clothes defiled with excrement
4. violate, abuse, rape, seduce, molest, ravish, deflower The soldiers brutally defiled her in front of her parents.

defile

verb
2. To make physically impure:
3. To make morally impure:
4. To spoil or mar the sanctity of:
5. To deprive of virginity:
Translations

defile

1 [ˈdiːfaɪl] Ndesfiladero m

defile

2 [dɪˈfaɪl] VT [+ honour] → manchar; [+ flag] → ultrajar; [+ sacred thing, memory] → profanar; [+ language] → corromper; [+ woman] → deshonrar

defile

[dɪˈfaɪl]
vt [+ person, place] → souiller
[ˈdiːfaɪl] n (= narrow valley) → défilé m

defile

1
nHohlweg m
vihintereinandermarschieren

defile

2
vt (= pollute, sully)verschmutzen, verunreinigen; (= desecrate)schänden, entweihen

defile

1 [dɪˈfaɪl] vt (frm) (pollute) → deturpare

defile

2 [ˈdiːfaɪl]
1. n (liter) (passage) → gola
2. vi (march) → sfilare
References in classic literature ?
He met us hard by, in our outward march to ambush his advance, and scattered us, like driven deer, through the defile, to the shores of Horican.
The conversation seemed to have taken an unfortunate turn, and both the girls experienced a feeling of relief when they entered the long gulch or defile that led to Indian Spring.
A few moments' scrambling brought them to the top of the ledge; the path then passed between a narrow defile, where only one could walk at a time, till suddenly they came to a rift or chasm more than a yard in breadth, and beyond which lay a pile of rocks, separate from the rest of the ledge, standing full thirty feet high, with its sides steep and perpendicular as those of a castle.
It is not fitting, sister," she said, "that my hand, stained with toil, should defile yours, fresh with the scent of flowers.
Here one might gaze up the green rocky defile through which the Sly made pebbly music, and through which wound romantic walks and natural galleries, where far inland you might wander
It has pleased Our Lady and my patron saint to bless the pittance to which I restrain myself, even as the pulse and water was blessed to the children Shadrach, Meshech, and Abednego, who drank the same rather than defile themselves with the wine and meats which were appointed them by the King of the Saracens.
I only desired he would lend me two clean shirts, which, having been washed since he wore them, I believed would not so much defile me.
My horse was traveling practically unguided as I knew that I had probably less knowledge of the exact location of the trail to the pass than he, and thus it happened that he entered a defile which led to the summit of the range and not to the pass which I had hoped would carry me to the valley and to safety.
That was my ruin, for when I was in the mud I comforted myself with the thought that at other times I was a hero, and the hero was a cloak for the mud: for an ordinary man it was shameful to defile himself, but a hero was too lofty to be utterly defiled, and so he might defile himself.
Then outrages were heaped upon me, and as my soul was not subdued they wished to defile my body forever.
In old times the settlers used to be astounded by the inroads of the northern Indians coming down upon them from this mountain rampart through some defile known only to themselves.
They had to be continually on the alert, too, against the mountain tribes, who beset every defile, laid ambuscades in their path, or attacked them in their night encampments; so that, of the hardy bands of trappers that first entered into these regions, three-fifths are said to have fallen by the hands of savage foes.