dehydration


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de·hy·dra·tion

 (dē′hī-drā′shən)
n.
1. The process of removing water from a substance or compound.
2. Excessive loss of water from the body or from an organ or body part, as from illness or fluid deprivation.

de•hy•dra•tion

(ˌdi haɪˈdreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act or process of dehydrating.
2. an abnormal loss of water from the body, esp. from illness or physical exertion.
[1850–55]

de·hy·dra·tion

(dē′hī-drā′shən)
1. The process of losing or removing water or moisture.
2. Excessive loss of water and often salts from the body, as from heavy sweating or illness.

dehydration

1. the process of dehydrating or removing the water from a substance.
2. the state of being dehydrated.
See also: Water

dehydration

A chemical reaction to remove a water molecule from a compound.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dehydration - dryness resulting from the removal of water
dryness, waterlessness, xerotes - the condition of not containing or being covered by a liquid (especially water)
2.dehydration - depletion of bodily fluids
thirst, thirstiness - a physiological need to drink
3.dehydration - the process of extracting moisture
extraction - the process of obtaining something from a mixture or compound by chemical or physical or mechanical means
freeze-drying, lyophilisation, lyophilization - a method of drying food or blood plasma or pharmaceuticals or tissue without destroying their physical structure; material is frozen and then warmed in a vacuum so that the ice sublimes
inspissation - the process of thickening by dehydration
plastination - a process involving fixation and dehydration and forced impregnation and hardening of biological tissues; water and lipids are replaced by curable polymers (silicone or epoxy or polyester) that are subsequently hardened; "the plastination of specimens is valuable for research and teaching"
Translations
تَجْفيف، جَفاف
dehydratace
dehydreringudtørring
DehydrationTrocknung
dehidrációvíztelenítés
dehydratácia
kurutmasuyunu alma

dehydration

[ˌdiːhaɪˈdreɪʃən] Ndeshidratación f

dehydration

[ˌdiːhaɪˈdreɪʃən] n [person] → déshydratation fde-ice [diːˈaɪs] vt [+ windscreen] → dégivrerde-icer [diːˈaɪsər] n (for car)dégivreur mde-icing fluid [diːˈaɪsɪŋ] nantigel m

dehydration

nAustrocknung f, → Dehydration f (spec); (of vegetables, milk etc)Trocknung f, → Dehydration f (spec)

dehydration

[ˌdiːhaɪˈdreɪʃn] ndisidratazione f

dehydrate

(diːhaiˈdreit) verb
to remove water from or dry out (especially foodstuffs). Vegetables take up less space if they have been dehydrated.
ˌdehyˈdration noun

de·hy·dra·tion

n. deshidratación, perdida de líquido, esp. agua.

dehydration

n deshidratación f
References in periodicals archive ?
Summary: Panaji (Goa) [India] February 27 (ANI): Goa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar is likely to be discharged from hospital tomorrow as he is recovering from mild dehydration.
HYDERABAD -- The scorching heat of current hot spell not only increased dehydration and food poisoning cases, but also bring the people down from heatstroke, the most severe form of heat related illness.
The best way to prevent dehydration is to drink often throughout the day, especially before an outdoor activity.
by Jishy Seby Dehydration occurs when your body loses more fluid than you take in.
You can usually reverse mild to moderate dehydration by drinking more fluids, but severe dehydration needs immediate medical treatment
TEHRAN (FNA)- Repeated heat-related dehydration has been associated with increased risk of chronic kidney damage in mice.
HYDERABAD -- Assistant Professor of Paediatrics, Liaquat University of Medical Health Sciences (LUMHS) Jamshoro, Rehman Siyal has said that the excessive loss of water from the body and the diseases of the gastrointestinal tract can lead to dehydration in various ways.
The Water Keeps You Well campaign tackles the issue of dehydration, particularly among older hospital patients.
A variety of mathematical equations already exist to detect dehydration in blood, but none have been identified as being especially useful for elderly patients, according to the researchers.
The swelling behaviour and swelling kinetics of various types of hydrogels have been extensively studied [4, 5], However, the mechanism and kinetics of the dehydration of hydrogels has not been sufficiently studied.
The terrestrial midge Belgica antarctica relies extensively on dehydration to survive the low temperatures and desiccation stress that prevail in its Antarctic habitat.
The surgery wanted to also ensure that pet owners knew the signs of dehydration, which include heavy panting and heaving flanks.