deism


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de·ism

 (dē′ĭz′əm, dā′-)
n.
A religious belief holding that God created the universe and established rationally comprehensible moral and natural laws but does not intervene in human affairs through miracles or supernatural revelation.

[French déisme, from Latin deus, god; see dyeu- in Indo-European roots.]

de′ist n.
de·is′tic adj.
de·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

deism

(ˈdiːɪzəm; ˈdeɪ-)
n
(Theology) belief in the existence of God based solely on natural reason, without reference to revelation. Compare theism
[C17: from French déisme, from Latin deus god]
ˈdeist n, adj
deˈistic, deˈistical adj
deˈistically adv

de•ism

(ˈdi ɪz əm)

n.
belief in the existence of a God on the evidence of reason and nature, with rejection of supernatural revelation.
[1675–85; < French déisme < Latin de(us) god + French -isme -ism]
de′ist, n.
de•is′tic, de•is′ti•cal, adj.
de•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

deism

the acknowledgment of the existence of a god upon the testimony of reason and of nature and its laws, and the rejection of the possibility of supernatural intervention in human affairs and of special revelation. — deist, n.deistic, adj.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deism - the form of theological rationalism that believes in God on the basis of reason without reference to revelation
rationalism - the theological doctrine that human reason rather than divine revelation establishes religious truth
Translations
deismus
deisme
deism
deismi
דאיזם
deizam
deisme
deizm
deism
deism
自然神論

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm] Ndeísmo m

deism

[ˈdiːɪzəm ˈdeɪɪzəm] ndéisme m

deism

nDeismus m
References in classic literature ?
He was also younger brother of Lord Edward Herbert of Cherbury, an inveterate duellist and the father of English Deism.
Even worse is the tendency to refer to these practices as "ceremonial deism," a phrase that is yet another legal dodge.
By the end of the eighteenth century, the theft hypothesis so dear to Deism, had pretty much lost conviction, and a new explanation was needed.
The 1950s were indeed a time of what legal scholar Eugene Rostow called "ceremonial deism.
What she described sounded like a lesson on deism from my college theology course, if it had been told from the creator's point of view.
Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson cultivated diverse interests and philosophies, with inclinations toward Deism rather than orthodox Christianity.
My views on faith are complicated -- somewhere between deism and agnosticism.
Part of Eerdmans's Guide to Theology series, which has as its primary audience students of theology, the volume deftly covers such topics as biblical exegesis, providence, deism, evolutionary theory, environmental ethics, and extraterrestrials.
Unlike the inclusion of "In God We Trust" on money, which several federal courts have deemed an acceptable form of "ceremonial deism," the use of a specific Bible verse on police cars incorporated into the department's official seal left little doubt that the sheriff sought to promote belief over non-belief.
The founders' deism, Stewart elaborates, was "functionally indistinguishable from what we would now call pantheism'; and pantheism is really just a pretty word for atheism.
Kaye Cook and her colleagues found that the Christian college experience is a spiritually formative experience that runs contrary to the prevailing winds of emerging adult religiousness which has been described in the literature as a moralistic therapeutic deism "that reduces God to a distant, moralizing problem-solver" (p.
But, whereas Holmes's examination of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries concluded that the era was one of deism, agnosticism, and even secularism, and that many of the founders were not practicing or observant Christians in any conventional sense, his analysis of the presidents since 1945 reveals widespread faith in an era of increasing secularization and estrangement from institutional religion.