deluge


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

del·uge

 (dĕl′yo͞oj, -yo͞ozh, dā′lo͞oj, -lo͞ozh, dĭ-lo͞oj′, -lo͞ozh′)
n.
1.
a. A great flood.
b. A heavy downpour.
2. Something that overwhelms as if by a great flood: a deluge of fan mail.
3. Deluge In the Bible, the great flood that occurred in the time of Noah.
tr.v. del·uged, del·ug·ing, del·ug·es
1. To overrun with water; inundate.
2. To overwhelm with a large number or amount; swamp: The press secretary was deluged with requests for information.

[From Middle English, flood, from Old French, from Latin dīluvium, from dīluere, to wash away : dis-, apart; see dis- + -luere, to wash; see leu(ə)- in Indo-European roots.]

deluge

(ˈdɛljuːdʒ)
n
1. a great flood of water
2. torrential rain; downpour
3. an overwhelming rush or number: a deluge of requests.
vb (tr)
4. to flood, as with water; soak, swamp, or drown
5. to overwhelm or overrun; inundate
[C14: from Old French, from Latin dīluvium a washing away, flood, from dīluere to wash away, drench, from di- dis-1 + -luere, from lavere to wash]

Deluge

n
(Bible) the Deluge another name for the Flood

del•uge

(ˈdɛl yudʒ, -yuʒ, -udʒ, -uʒ, dɪˈludʒ, -ˈluʒ)

n., v. -uged, -ug•ing. n.
1. a great flood of water; inundation; flood.
2. a drenching rain; downpour.
3. anything that overwhelms like a flood: a deluge of mail.
4. the Deluge, flood (def. 3).
v.t.
5. to flood; inundate.
6. to overrun; overwhelm.
[1325–75; Middle English < Old French < Latin dīluvium flood =dīluv-, base of dīluere to wash away (see dilute) + -ium -ium1]

deluge


Past participle: deluged
Gerund: deluging

Imperative
deluge
deluge
Present
I deluge
you deluge
he/she/it deluges
we deluge
you deluge
they deluge
Preterite
I deluged
you deluged
he/she/it deluged
we deluged
you deluged
they deluged
Present Continuous
I am deluging
you are deluging
he/she/it is deluging
we are deluging
you are deluging
they are deluging
Present Perfect
I have deluged
you have deluged
he/she/it has deluged
we have deluged
you have deluged
they have deluged
Past Continuous
I was deluging
you were deluging
he/she/it was deluging
we were deluging
you were deluging
they were deluging
Past Perfect
I had deluged
you had deluged
he/she/it had deluged
we had deluged
you had deluged
they had deluged
Future
I will deluge
you will deluge
he/she/it will deluge
we will deluge
you will deluge
they will deluge
Future Perfect
I will have deluged
you will have deluged
he/she/it will have deluged
we will have deluged
you will have deluged
they will have deluged
Future Continuous
I will be deluging
you will be deluging
he/she/it will be deluging
we will be deluging
you will be deluging
they will be deluging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been deluging
you have been deluging
he/she/it has been deluging
we have been deluging
you have been deluging
they have been deluging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been deluging
you will have been deluging
he/she/it will have been deluging
we will have been deluging
you will have been deluging
they will have been deluging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been deluging
you had been deluging
he/she/it had been deluging
we had been deluging
you had been deluging
they had been deluging
Conditional
I would deluge
you would deluge
he/she/it would deluge
we would deluge
you would deluge
they would deluge
Past Conditional
I would have deluged
you would have deluged
he/she/it would have deluged
we would have deluged
you would have deluged
they would have deluged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.deluge - an overwhelming number or amountdeluge - an overwhelming number or amount; "a flood of requests"; "a torrent of abuse"
good deal, great deal, hatful, lot, muckle, passel, peck, mickle, mint, quite a little, slew, spate, tidy sum, wad, stack, raft, mountain, pile, plenty, mass, batch, heap, deal, flock, pot, mess, sight - (often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent; "a batch of letters"; "a deal of trouble"; "a lot of money"; "he made a mint on the stock market"; "see the rest of the winners in our huge passel of photos"; "it must have cost plenty"; "a slew of journalists"; "a wad of money"
2.deluge - a heavy raindeluge - a heavy rain        
rain, rainfall - water falling in drops from vapor condensed in the atmosphere
3.deluge - the rising of a body of water and its overflowing onto normally dry landdeluge - the rising of a body of water and its overflowing onto normally dry land; "plains fertilized by annual inundations"
geological phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the structure or composition of the earth
debacle - flooding caused by a tumultuous breakup of ice in a river during the spring or summer
flash flood, flashflood - a sudden local flood of great volume and short duration
Noachian deluge, Noah and the Flood, Noah's flood, the Flood - (Biblical) the great deluge that is said in the Book of Genesis to have occurred in the time of Noah; it was brought by God upon the earth because of the wickedness of human beings
Verb1.deluge - fill quickly beyond capacity; as with a liquid; "the basement was inundated after the storm"; "The images flooded his mind"
fill, fill up, make full - make full, also in a metaphorical sense; "fill a container"; "fill the child with pride"
2.deluge - charge someone with too many tasks
burden, saddle, charge - impose a task upon, assign a responsibility to; "He charged her with cleaning up all the files over the weekend"
3.deluge - fill or cover completely, usually with water
flood - cover with liquid, usually water; "The swollen river flooded the village"; "The broken vein had flooded blood in her eyes"

deluge

noun
1. rush, flood, avalanche, barrage, spate, torrent a deluge of criticism
2. flood, spate, overflowing, torrent, downpour, cataclysm, inundation A dozen homes were damaged in the deluge.
verb
1. overwhelm, swamp, engulf, overload, overrun, inundate The office was deluged with complaints.
2. flood, drown, swamp, submerge, soak, drench, inundate, douse Torrential rain deluged the capital.

deluge

noun
An abundant, usually overwhelming flow or fall, as of a river or rain:
Chiefly British: spate.
verb
1. To flow over completely:
2. To affect as if by an outpouring of water:
Translations
سَيْل، فَيَضانيُغْرِق
povodeňzaplavit
drukneoversvømmeoversvømmelse
özönvíz
flóîyfiròyrma
potvynisužtvindyti
lietusgāzepārpludinātplūdi
tufanyağdırmak

deluge

[ˈdeljuːdʒ]
A. N [of rain] → diluvio m; [of floodwater] → inundación f
the Deluge (Rel) → el Diluvio
a deluge of protestsuna avalancha de protestas
B. VT (fig) → inundar (with de) he was deluged with giftsse vio inundado de regalos, le llovieron los regalos
he was deluged with questionslo acribillaron a preguntas, le llovieron las preguntas
we are deluged with worktenemos trabajo hasta encima de las cabezas, estamos hasta las cejas de trabajo

deluge

[ˈdɛljuːdʒ]
n
(= downpour) → déluge m
(fig) (= flood) a deluge of sth → un déluge de qch
vt (fig) to be deluged with sth [+ phone calls, requests] → être submergé(e) de qch, être submergé(e) par qch

deluge

n (lit)Überschwemmung f; (of rain)Guss m; (fig, of complaints, letters etc) → Flut f; the Deluge (Bibl) → die Sintflut
vt (lit, fig)überschwemmen, überfluten

deluge

[ˈdɛljuːdʒ]
1. ndiluvio
a deluge of protests → un diluvio di proteste
2. vt (fig) to deluge (with)subissare (di), inondare (di)

deluge

(ˈdeljuːdʒ) noun
a great quantity of water. Few people survived the deluge.
verb
to fill or overwhelm with a great quantity. We've been deluged with orders for our new book.
References in classic literature ?
There was something in the small valor of it that quite finished me: these three words from her were, in a flash like the glitter of a drawn blade, the jostle of the cup that my hand, for weeks and weeks, had held high and full to the brim that now, even before speaking, I felt overflow in a deluge.
As we pluck out the shafts, stand aside; here's the battering-ram, Capricornus, or the Goat; full tilt, he comes rushing, and headlong we are tossed; when Aquarius, or the Water-bearer, pours out his whole deluge and drowns us; and to wind up with Pisces, or the Fishes, we sleep.
It was very soon discovered that whoever cast an indignity on Topsy was sure to meet with some inconvenient accident shortly after;--either a pair of ear-rings or some cherished trinket would be missing, or an article of dress would be suddenly found utterly ruined, or the person would stumble accidently into a pail of hot water, or a libation of dirty slop would unaccountably deluge them from above when in full gala dress;-and on all these occasions, when investigation was made, there was nobody found to stand sponsor for the indignity.
But when the silver rim of the sun pushed itself out, a moment or two later, the assemblage broke loose with a vast shout and came pouring down like a deluge to smother me with blessings and gratitude; and Clarence was not the last of the wash, to be sure.
At the word, the deluge of blows began, but before long the surgeon once more interfered--for the only reason which ever permits him to interfere--and the day's war was over.
The window went up, a maid-servant's discordant voice profaned the holy calm, and a deluge of water drenched the prone martyr's remains!
She has been dying for your sake several weeks, and raving about you this morning, and pouring forth a deluge of abuse, because I represented your failings in a plain light, for the purpose of mitigating her adoration.
Was she still self-isolated from her husband's deluge of words?
What private solicitude could rear itself against the deluge of the Year One of Liberty--the deluge rising from below, not falling from above, and with the windows of Heaven shut, not opened!
As when the potent Rod Of AMRAMS Son in EGYPTS evill day Wav'd round the Coast, up call'd a pitchy cloud Of LOCUSTS, warping on the Eastern Wind, That ore the Realm of impious PHAROAH hung Like Night, and darken'd all the Land of NILE: So numberless were those bad Angels seen Hovering on wing under the Cope of Hell 'Twixt upper, nether, and surrounding Fires; Till, as a signal giv'n, th' uplifted Spear Of their great Sultan waving to direct Thir course, in even ballance down they light On the firm brimstone, and fill all the Plain; A multitude, like which the populous North Pour'd never from her frozen loyns, to pass RHENE or the DANAW, when her barbarous Sons Came like a Deluge on the South, and spread Beneath GIBRALTAR to the LYBIAN sands.
The keeper obeyed, and Don Quixote, fixing on the point of his lance the cloth he had wiped his face with after the deluge of curds, proceeded to recall the others, who still continued to fly, looking back at every step, all in a body, the gentleman bringing up the rear.
The rain still poured as though the deluge were returning, and it was no easy matter to make a light in such a world of wet and darkness.