delusion


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Related to delusion: schizophrenia, delirium, delusion of reference

de·lu·sion

 (dĭ-lo͞o′zhən)
n.
1.
a. The act or process of deluding.
b. The state of being deluded.
2.
a. A false belief or opinion: labored under the delusion that success was at hand.
b. Psychiatry A false belief or perception that is a manifestation of a mental illness: delusions of persecution.

[Middle English delusioun, from Latin dēlūsiō, dēlūsiōn-, from dēlūsus, past participle of dēlūdere, to delude; see delude.]

de·lu′sion·al adj.

delusion

(dɪˈluːʒən)
n
1. (Psychiatry) a mistaken or misleading opinion, idea, belief, etc: he has delusions of grandeur.
2. (Psychiatry) psychiatry a belief held in the face of evidence to the contrary, that is resistant to all reason. See also illusion, hallucination
3. (Psychiatry) the act of deluding or state of being deluded
deˈlusional, deˈlusionary adj
deˈlusive adj
deˈlusively adv
deˈlusiveness n
delusory adj

de•lu•sion

(dɪˈlu ʒən)

n.
1. an act or instance of deluding.
2. the state of being deluded.
3. a false belief or opinion: delusions of grandeur.
4. a false belief that is resistant to reason or confrontation with actual fact: a paranoid delusion.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin dēlūsiō; see delude, -tion]
de•lu′sion•al, de•lu′sion•ar′y, adj.

illusion

delusion

You can use either of these words to say that someone has a wrong belief.

They have the illusion that every contingency can be worked out in advance.
One patient had the delusion that he was Trotsky.

You say that someone is under an illusion or delusion.

Finally, I think he wanted me because he was under the illusion that I was loaded with money.
I still laboured under the nice middle-class delusion that everyone was a good guy at heart.

You can also say that someone suffers from an illusion or delusion.

A man who has had a leg amputated often suffers from the delusion that the leg is still there.

If you have an illusion of something, you believe that it exists when in fact it does not.

We have an illusion of freedom.
In return they are allowed the illusion of a guiltless life.
1. another meaning of 'illusion'

An illusion is also something that looks or sounds like one thing, but is either something else or is not there at all.

It might be an optical illusion but he actually seems to lift some horses in races when they are tired.
I fancy I can hear her voice, but that must be an illusion.

You do not use delusion with this meaning.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.delusion - (psychology) an erroneous belief that is held in the face of evidence to the contrarydelusion - (psychology) an erroneous belief that is held in the face of evidence to the contrary
psychological science, psychology - the science of mental life
mental condition, mental state, psychological condition, psychological state - (psychology) a mental condition in which the qualities of a state are relatively constant even though the state itself may be dynamic; "a manic state"
delusions of grandeur - a delusion (common in paranoia) that you are much greater and more powerful and influential than you really are
delusions of persecution - a delusion (common in paranoia) that others are out to get you and frustrate and embarrass you or inflict suffering on you; a complicated conspiracy is frequently imagined
hallucination - illusory perception; a common symptom of severe mental disorder
nihilistic delusion, nihilism - the delusion that things (or everything, including the self) do not exist; a sense that everything is unreal
somatic delusion - a delusion concerning the body image or parts of the body
zoanthropy - the delusion that you have assumed the form of an animal
2.delusion - a mistaken or unfounded opinion or idea; "he has delusions of competence"; "his dreams of vast wealth are a hallucination"
misconception - an incorrect conception
disorientation, freak out - a wild delusion (especially one induced by a hallucinogenic drug)
3.delusion - the act of deluding; deception by creating illusory ideas
dissimulation, deception, dissembling, deceit - the act of deceiving

delusion

delusion

noun
An erroneous perception of reality:
Translations
خِداع، غِشغرور
bludhalucinace
vrangforestilling
harhakuvitelma
hugarórar; ranghugmynd
blud

delusion

[dɪˈluːʒən] N (= false impression) → engaño m, error m; (= hope) → ilusión f (Psych) → delirio m
delusions of grandeurdelirios mpl de grandeza
to labour under a delusionabrigar una falsa ilusión
she's labouring under the delusion that she's going to get the jobabriga la falsa ilusión de que va a conseguir el puesto, se engaña pensando que va a conseguir el puesto

delusion

[dɪˈluːʒən] nillusion f
to be under the delusion that ... → croire naïvement que ...
to have delusions of grandeur, to suffer from delusions of grandeur → avoir la folie des grandeurs

delusion

nIllusion f, → Irrglaube m no pl; (Psych) → Wahnvorstellung f; to be or labour (Brit) or labor (US) under a delusionin einem Wahn leben; to have delusions of grandeurden Größenwahn haben

delusion

[dɪˈluːʒn] nillusione f (Psych) → fissazione f

delude

(diˈluːd) verb
to deceive or mislead (usually without actually telling lies). She deluded herself into thinking he cared for her.
deˈlusion (-ʒən) noun
a false belief, especially as a symptom of mental illness. The young man was suffering from delusions.

de·lu·sion

n. delirio, decepción, engaño; creencias falsas;
___ of control___ de control;
___ of grandeur___ de grandeza;
___ of negation___ de negación;
___ of persecution___ de persecución.

delusion

n delirio, falsa creencia patológica; delusions of grandeur delirios de grandeza
References in classic literature ?
John Brooke', and evidently laboring under the delusion that the whole affair had been brought about by his excellent management.
Whatever might be the extent of the self- delusion of his enemies, and however it had tended to assist his schemes, the slightest cause of suspicion, acting on the subtle nature of an Indian, would be likely to prove fatal.
He was one of the martyrs to that terrible delusion, which should teach us, among its other morals, that the influential classes, and those who take upon themselves to be leaders of the people, are fully liable to all the passionate error that has ever characterized the maddest mob.
It was a pity that I should have had to quaver out again the reasons for my not having, in my delusion, so much as questioned that the little girl saw our visitant even as I actually saw Mrs.
Though I cannot tell why it was exactly that those stage managers, the Fates, put me down for this shabby part of a whaling voyage, when others were set down for magnificent parts in high tragedies, and short and easy parts in genteel comedies, and jolly parts in farces --though I cannot tell why this was exactly; yet, now that I recall all the circumstances, I think I can see a little into the springs and motives which being cunningly presented to me under various disguises, induced me to set about performing the part I did, besides cajoling me into the delusion that it was a choice resulting from my own unbiased freewill and discriminating judgment.
It is plain, then, that phrenologically the head of this Leviathan, in the creature's living intact state, is an entire delusion.
It would be wasted time to try to argue her out of her delusion, it couldn't be done; I must just humor it.
The fatigue was so great that it presently began to make some head against the nervous excitement; while imagining myself wide awake, I would really doze into momentary unconsciousness, and come suddenly out of it with a physical jerk which nearly wrenched my joints apart--the delusion of the instant being that I was tumbling backward over a precipice.
She saw, that in persuading herself, in fancying, in acting to the contrary, she had been entirely under a delusion, totally ignorant of her own heartand, in short, that she had never really cared for Frank Churchill at all!
Now," said he, "that little space was given to delirium and delusion.
One was about forty: a period of mental vigour at which men seldom cherish the delusion of being married for love by girls: that dream is reserved for the solace of our declining years.
When the doubt had first suggested itself she had treated it as a mere delusion.