demagogue


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dem·a·gogue

also dem·a·gog  (dĕm′ə-gôg′, -gŏg′)
n.
1. A leader who obtains power by means of impassioned appeals to the emotions and prejudices of the populace.
2. A leader of the common people in ancient times.
tr.v. dem·a·gogued, dem·a·gogu·ing, dem·a·gogues also dem·a·goged or dem·a·go·ging or dem·a·goges
Usage Problem To speak about (an issue, for example) in the manner of a demagogue.

[Greek dēmagōgos, popular leader : dēmos, people; see dā- in Indo-European roots + agōgos, leading (from agein, to lead; see ag- in Indo-European roots).]
Usage Note: Even though demagogue has been used as a verb meaning "to speak about something in the manner of a demagogue" since the 1600s, the verb has kept a low profile in the language. Recently, however, it has become a favorite of newspaper columnists. The Usage Panel does not view the verb with much favor in either its transitive or intransitive use. In our 1997 survey, 94 percent rejected it in the sentence Clinton will demagogue Medicare, unwilling to acknowledge that fundamental reforms need to be made in the system. A similar percentage rejected an example in which a representative can demagogue about price-fixing. Perhaps this resistance should not be surprising, since the use of familiar nouns as verbs is often the subject of complaints.

demagogue

(ˈdɛməˌɡɒɡ) or

demagog

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political agitator who appeals with crude oratory to the prejudice and passions of the mob
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp in the ancient world) any popular political leader or orator
[C17: from Greek dēmagōgos people's leader, from dēmos people + agein to lead]

dem•a•gogue

or dem•a•gog

(ˈdɛm əˌgɒg, -ˌgɔg)

n., v. -gogued, -gogu•ing. n.
1. a person, esp. a political leader, who gains power by arousing people's emotions and prejudices.
2. (in ancient times) a leader of the people.
v.i.
3. to speak or act like a demagogue.
[1640–50; < Greek dēmagōgós=dêm(os) people + agōgós guiding]

demagogue

A person who gains the support of the public by making impassioned speeches that appeal to their emotions and prejudices.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demagogue - a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular passions and prejudices
pol, political leader, politico, politician - a person active in party politics

demagogue

noun agitator, firebrand, haranguer, rabble-rouser, soapbox orator He was dismissed as a radical demagogue.
Translations
demagog
扇動
demagog

demagogue

demagog (US sometimes) [ˈdeməgɒ>g] Ndemagogo/a m/f

demagogue

[ˈdɛməgɒg] ndémagogue mf

demagogue

, (US) demagog
nDemagoge m, → Demagogin f

demagogue

[ˈdɛməgɒg] n (pej) → demagogo
References in classic literature ?
The moon, too, which had long been climbing overhead, and unobtrusively melting its disk into the azure,--like an ambitious demagogue, who hides his aspiring purpose by assuming the prevalent hue of popular sentiment,--now began to shine out, broad and oval, in its middle pathway.
He forthwith adopts one of the candidates thus selected as the only available one, thus proving that he is himself available for any purposes of the demagogue.
This youth had been a prodigy at college, and European fame was promised him when he was barely fifteen; but when he appeared in the world he failed, first publicly as a dramatist and a demagogue, and then privately for years on end as an actor, a traveller, a commission agent or a journalist.
A poor man is despised the whole world over; despised as much by a Christian as by a lord, as much by a demagogue as by a footman, and not all the copy-book maxims ever set for ink stained youth will make him respected.
A person who, fifty years ago, would probably have been tried at the Old Bailey for some demagogue proceeding, and severely punished--if not," adds Sir Leicester after a moment's pause, "if not hanged, drawn, and quartered.
He spoke with great vigor at the top of his voice; soon we had a little crowd about us; but the tall collars and the broad smiles of the younger Old Boys did not deter our dowdy demagogue.
After a good deal of fruitless argument the question was referred for decision to a passing Coyote, who was a bit of a demagogue and desirous to stand well with both.
Denis Kearney, a notorious demagogue of San Francisco, whose audiences
This editor, who published patent medicine advertisements, called me a scoundrelly demagogue because I dared him to print in his paper the truth about patent medicines.
There is in the world a very aged rioter and demagogue who breaks into the most refined retreats with the dreadful information that all men are brothers, and wherever this leveller went on his pale horse it was Father Brown's trade to follow.
Jones wrote a full and particular account of the dinner, which appeared duly in the Demagogue.
Come," he said, "you can have no sympathy with Reginald Brott, the sworn enemy of our class, a Socialist, a demagogue who would parcel out our lands in allotments, a man who has pledged himself to nothing more nor less than a revolution.