demagogue


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dem·a·gogue

also dem·a·gog (dĕm′ə-gôg′, -gŏg′)
n.
1. A leader who obtains power by means of impassioned appeals to the emotions and prejudices of the populace.
2. A leader of the common people in ancient times.
v. dem·a·gogued, dem·a·gogu·ing, dem·a·gogues also dem·a·goged , dem·a·go·ging , dem·a·goges
v. tr.
Usage Problem To speak about (an issue, for example) in the manner of a demagogue.
v. intr.
Usage Problem To speak in the manner of a demagogue.

[Greek dēmagōgos, popular leader : dēmos, people; see dā- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots + agōgos, leading (from agein, to lead; see ag- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots).]
Usage Note: Even though demagogue has been used as a verb meaning "to speak about something with the tactics of a demagogue" since the 1600s, the verb has kept a low profile in the language. The Usage Panel does not view the verb with much favor in either its transitive or intransitive use. In our 2016 survey, between 85 and 89 percent of the Usage Panel rejected it in a range of intransitive and transitive examples. These results are only slightly more favorable than when this issue was last balloted, nearly two decades earlier. Perhaps this continued resistance should not be surprising, since the use of familiar nouns as verbs is often the subject of complaints.

demagogue

(ˈdɛməˌɡɒɡ) or

demagog

n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political agitator who appeals with crude oratory to the prejudice and passions of the mob
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (esp in the ancient world) any popular political leader or orator
[C17: from Greek dēmagōgos people's leader, from dēmos people + agein to lead]

dem•a•gogue

or dem•a•gog

(ˈdɛm əˌgɒg, -ˌgɔg)

n., v. -gogued, -gogu•ing. n.
1. a person, esp. a political leader, who gains power by arousing people's emotions and prejudices.
2. (in ancient times) a leader of the people.
v.i.
3. to speak or act like a demagogue.
[1640–50; < Greek dēmagōgós=dêm(os) people + agōgós guiding]

demagogue

A person who gains the support of the public by making impassioned speeches that appeal to their emotions and prejudices.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demagogue - a political leader who seeks support by appealing to popular passions and prejudices
pol, political leader, politico, politician - a person active in party politics

demagogue

noun agitator, firebrand, haranguer, rabble-rouser, soapbox orator He was dismissed as a radical demagogue.
Translations
demagog
扇動
demagog

demagogue

demagog (US sometimes) [ˈdeməgɒ>g] Ndemagogo/a m/f

demagogue

[ˈdɛməgɒg] ndémagogue mf

demagogue

, (US) demagog
nDemagoge m, → Demagogin f

demagogue

[ˈdɛməgɒg] n (pej) → demagogo
References in classic literature ?
After a good deal of fruitless argument the question was referred for decision to a passing Coyote, who was a bit of a demagogue and desirous to stand well with both.
Jones wrote a full and particular account of the dinner, which appeared duly in the Demagogue.
A poor man is despised the whole world over; despised as much by a Christian as by a lord, as much by a demagogue as by a footman, and not all the copy-book maxims ever set for ink stained youth will make him respected.
Come," he said, "you can have no sympathy with Reginald Brott, the sworn enemy of our class, a Socialist, a demagogue who would parcel out our lands in allotments, a man who has pledged himself to nothing more nor less than a revolution.
The moon, too, which had long been climbing overhead, and unobtrusively melting its disk into the azure,--like an ambitious demagogue, who hides his aspiring purpose by assuming the prevalent hue of popular sentiment,--now began to shine out, broad and oval, in its middle pathway.
He was too lazy even for a mere demagogue, for a workman orator, for a leader of labour.
But it is evident that this was not Solon's intention, but that it arose from accident; for the people being the cause of the naval victory over the Medes, assumed greatly upon it, and enlisted themselves under factious demagogues, although opposed by the better part of the citizens.
History will teach us that the former has been found a much more certain road to the introduction of despotism than the latter, and that of those men who have overturned the liberties of republics, the greatest number have begun their career by paying an obsequious court to the people; commencing demagogues, and ending tyrants.
The seditious harangues of demagogues in Faneuil Hall have made rebels of a loyal people and deprived me of my country.
The demagogues of this Province have raised the devil and cannot lay him again.
Adolf Hitler formed the party and garnered support with one demagogue based promise, on the ideologue mentioned previously.
No wonder that many peoples, including our own, will look for the false messiah in the form of a demagogue or a populist or called by the name preferred by Albert Camus, Thomas Mann, and more recently, Rob Reimer: the fascist.