demand-pull

Related to demand-pull: cost-push

de·mand-pull

(dĭ-mănd′po͝ol′)
n.
Increased demand for a limited supply of goods and services, tending to cause consumer prices to increase.

de·mand′-pull′ adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cost push is due to higher cost of production that can come from different policies and doing-business activities, while demand-pull is due to rising income, which can cause people to buy or demand more goods/services than what is available.
It's a separate story, though, that demand-pull inflation has already been in sight as the economy is growing fast.
While we reiterate that the first round effect of the energy subsidy cut is inevitable and transitory, the CBE's recent 200bps interest rate hike will also help absorb the demand-pull second round effects," Pharos Holding Economist Ramy Oraby said.
In the demand-pull scenario, it is expected that the CPI and the PPI for finished goods will have a predictive impact on the ECI.
Transmission and Storage for Spectra Energy, said, "Securing this project connects us to another key demand-pull market, and brings us closer to our goal of securing $35 billion in capital expansion projects by the end of this decade, with approximately $20 billion either in execution or in service since 2013.
Successfully securing this project adds to our already-strong asset portfolio, connects us to another key demand-pull market, and brings us closer to our goal of securing $35 billion in capital expansion projects by the end of this decade, with approximately $20 billion either in execution or in service since 2013.
While we expect inflation to remain subdued in the coming months, prompting further rate cuts by the authorities, inflation will accelerate by end-2016 and into 2017, driven by waning base effects from low oil prices and rising demand-pull pressures.
We discover that both the source of the inflation, whether demand-pull or cost-push, and the elasticity of aggregate demand with respect to the price level, are of consequence for the exchange rate.
This could help relieve constrains over households' purse strings but our view remains that deleveraging still has some way to run, meaning that consumer spending (and demand-pull price pressures) is likely to remain subdued for some time to come.
At the same time, he noted that the acceleration in inflation had mostly reflected power rate increases and typhoon-related price shocks rather than demand-pull price pressures.
Demand-pull inflation will rise, but stay at manageable, low single-digit levels.
Given the ongoing absence of any strong demand-pull pressure and relatively stable commodity markets, we have lowered our forecast for inflation to average 1.

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