demeanor


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.

de·mean·or

 (dĭ-mē′nər)
n.
The way in which a person behaves; deportment. See Synonyms at behavior.

de•mean•or

(dɪˈmi nər)

n.
1. conduct; behavior; deportment.
2. facial appearance; mien.
[1425–75; demenure; see demean2, -or1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demeanor - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other peopledemeanor - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
manners - social deportment; "he has the manners of a pig"
citizenship - conduct as a citizen; "award for good citizenship"
swashbuckling - flamboyantly reckless and boastful behavior
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
improperness, impropriety - an improper demeanor
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving

demeanor

noun
Behavior through which one reveals one's personality:
Archaic: port.
Translations
처신

demeanour

(dimiːnə) (American) demeanor noun
manner; bearing; the way one behaves.
References in classic literature ?
The sudden and lonely apparition of this woman, and her calm yet resolute demeanor, awakened universal curiosity.
He heard me to the end -- at first laughed heartily -- and then lapsed into an excessively grave demeanor, as if my insanity was a thing beyond suspicion.
My host, however, had in some degree resumed the calmness of his demeanor, and questioned me very rigorously in respect to the conformation of the visionary creature.
By far the greater number of those who went by had a satisfied business-like demeanor, and seemed to be thinking only of making their way through the press.
A few minutes brought us to a large and busy bazaar, with the localities of which the stranger appeared well acquainted, and where his original demeanor again became apparent, as he forced his way to and fro, without aim, among the host of buyers and sellers.
Close behind these two came a young man of very striking countenance and demeanor, with deep thought and contemplation on his brow, and perhaps a flash of enthusiiasm in his eye.
He went hastily down, and was followed by a dignified person, dressed in a purple velvet suit with very rich embroidery; his demeanor would have possessed much stateliness, only that a grievous fit of the gout compelled him to hobble from stair to stair, with contortions of face and body.
If he and his team chanced to be in the rear he preserved a demeanor of serenity, crossing his legs and bursting forth into yells when foot passengers took dangerous dives beneath the noses of his champing horses.
His whole demeanor I can describe only as disagreeably engaging.
They were unarmed, their aspect and demeanor friendly, and they held up otter-skins, and made signs indicative of a wish to trade.
On board ship he evidently assumed the hardness of deportment and sternness of demeanor which many deem essential to naval service.
Around the gibbets, and particularly at the entrances to the arcade of Saint Jean, moved a noisy mass, a busy mass; daring faces, resolute demeanors were to be seen here and there, mingled with silly faces and indifferent demeanors; signals were exchanged, hands given and taken.