demeanour


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demeanour

(dɪˈmiːnə) or

demeanor

n
1. the way a person behaves towards others; conduct
2. bearing, appearance, or mien
[C15: see demean2]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demeanour - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other peopledemeanour - (behavioral attributes) the way a person behaves toward other people
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
manners - social deportment; "he has the manners of a pig"
citizenship - conduct as a citizen; "award for good citizenship"
swashbuckling - flamboyantly reckless and boastful behavior
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
improperness, impropriety - an improper demeanor
personal manner, manner - a way of acting or behaving

demeanour

U.S. demeanor
noun behaviour, air, bearing, conduct, manner, carriage, deportment, mien, comportment her calm and cheerful demeanour
Translations
سُلوك، تَصَرُّف
chovánívystupovánízpůsoby
holdningopførseloptræden
hegîun
izturēšanāsuzvešanās

demeanour

demeanor (US) [dɪˈmiːnəʳ] Nconducta f, comportamiento m; (= bearing) → porte m

demeanour

[dɪˈmiːnər] (British) demeanor (US) n
(= way of behaving) → comportement m
(= appearance) → maintien m

demeanour

, (US) demeanor
n (= behaviour)Benehmen nt, → Auftreten nt; (= bearing)Haltung f

demeanour

demeanor (Am) [dɪˈmiːnəʳ] n (frm) → contegno

demeanour

(dimiːnə) (American) demeanor noun
manner; bearing; the way one behaves.
References in classic literature ?
And, in so intense a moment his demeanour would have still been calm.
It was the strain of a forsaken lady, who, after bewailing the perfidy of her lover, calls pride to her aid; desires her attendant to deck her in her brightest jewels and richest robes, and resolves to meet the false one that night at a ball, and prove to him, by the gaiety of her demeanour, how little his desertion has affected her.
Something especially reckless in his demeanour, not only gave him a disreputable look, but so diminished the strong resemblance he undoubtedly bore to the prisoner (which his momentary earnestness, when they were compared together, had strengthened), that many of the lookers-on, taking note of him now, said to one another they would hardly have thought the two were so alike.
Its dark brown curls were long and free; free as its genial face, its sparkling eye, its open hand, its cheery voice, its unconstrained demeanour, and its joyful air.
Dick had regularly assisted at our councils, with a meditative and sage demeanour.
I found the Blue Boar in possession of the intelligence, and I found that it made a great change in the Boar's demeanour.
Whereof hee soon aware, Each perturbation smooth'd with outward calme, Artificer of fraud; and was the first That practisd falshood under saintly shew, Deep malice to conceale, couch't with revenge: Yet not anough had practisd to deceive URIEL once warnd; whose eye pursu'd him down The way he went, and on th' ASSYRIAN mount Saw him disfigur'd, more then could befall Spirit of happie sort: his gestures fierce He markd and mad demeanour, then alone, As he suppos'd, all unobserv'd, unseen.
The outward appearance of these two men formed scarce a stronger contrast than their look and demeanour.
Her majesty, and those who attended her, were beyond measure delighted with my demeanour.
He himself could not help wondering at the calm of his demeanour, and for a moment felt keenly the terrible pleasure of a double life.
In the evening, when we retire to our apartments, I shall sit in the place of honour, where I shall assume a grand demeanour and speak little, gazing straight before me, and when my wife, lovely as the full moon, stands humbly in front of my chair I shall pretend not to see her.
It so happened, then, that Rocinante took a fancy to disport himself with their ladyships the ponies, and abandoning his usual gait and demeanour as he scented them, he, without asking leave of his master, got up a briskish little trot and hastened to make known his wishes to them; they, however, it seemed, preferred their pasture to him, and received him with their heels and teeth to such effect that they soon broke his girths and left him naked without a saddle to cover him; but what must have been worse to him was that the carriers, seeing the violence he was offering to their mares, came running up armed with stakes, and so belaboured him that they brought him sorely battered to the ground.