demerit

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de·mer·it

 (dĭ-mĕr′ĭt)
n.
1.
a. A quality or characteristic deserving of blame or censure; a fault.
b. Absence of merit.
2. A mark made against one's record for a fault or for misconduct.

[Middle English demerite, offense, from Old French desmerite, from Latin dēmeritum, from neuter past participle of dēmerēre, to deserve : dē-, de- + merēre, to earn; see (s)mer- in Indo-European roots.]

de·mer′i·to′ri·ous (-tôr′ē-əs) adj.
de·mer′i·to′ri·ous·ly adv.

demerit

(diːˈmɛrɪt; ˈdiːˌmɛrɪt)
n
1. something, esp conduct, that deserves censure
2. (Education) US and Canadian a mark given against a person for failure or misconduct, esp in schools or the armed forces
3. (Military) US and Canadian a mark given against a person for failure or misconduct, esp in schools or the armed forces
4. a fault or disadvantage
[C14 (originally: worth, later specialized to mean: something worthy of blame): from Latin dēmerērī to deserve]
deˌmeriˈtorious adj
deˌmeriˈtoriously adv

de•mer•it

(dɪˈmɛr ɪt)

n.
1. a mark against a person for misconduct or deficiency.
2. the quality of being censurable; fault; culpability.
3. Obs. offense.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Old French desmerite) < Medieval Latin dēmeritum fault, n. use of neuter past participle of Latin dēmerēre to earn, win the favor of (dē- taken in Medieval Latin as privative, hence pejorative). See de-, merit]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demerit - a mark against a person for misconduct or failure; usually given in school or armed forces; "ten demerits and he loses his privileges"
stigma, stain, brand, mark - a symbol of disgrace or infamy; "And the Lord set a mark upon Cain"--Genesis
2.demerit - the quality of being inadequate or falling short of perfection; "they discussed the merits and demerits of her novel"; "he knew his own faults much better than she did"
worth - the quality that renders something desirable or valuable or useful
merit, virtue - any admirable quality or attribute; "work of great merit"
Translations

demerit

[diːˈmerɪt] N (usu pl) → demérito m, desmerecimiento m

demerit

[diːˈmɛrɪt] n (= weak point) → démérite m
the demerits of sb/sth → les démérites de qn/qch

demerit

nSchwäche f, → Fehler m; (dated US: = black mark) → Minuspunkt m

demerit

[diːˈmɛrɪt] n (frm) → difetto
References in classic literature ?
The young man was relieved from the awkwardness of making any further protestations of his own demerits, by an exclamation from Chingachgook, and the attitude of riveted attention assumed by his son.
There goes a woman," resumed Roger Chillingworth, after a pause, "who, be her demerits what they may, hath none of that mystery of hidden sinfulness which you deem so grievous to be borne.
Some portion of respect for herself, however, in spite of all these demerits some concern for her own appearance, and a strong sense of justice by Harriet(there would be no need of compassion to the girl who believed herself loved by Mr.
It must be admitted that there are exceptions to this rule; but these exceptions depend so entirely on accidental causes, that they cannot be considered as having any relation to the intrinsic merits or demerits of a constitution.
Monsieur Baptistin," said the count, "you have been in my service one year, the time I generally give myself to judge of the merits or demerits of those about me.
Eustace put his bundle of manuscript into my hands; and I skimmed through it pretty rapidly, trying to find out its merits and demerits by the touch of my fingers, as a veteran story-teller ought to know how to do.
I was examined with the closest scrutiny; my merits were inwardly applauded, and my demerits pronounced to be absolutely none.
But either his success, or the frequency of the transgression in others, soon wiped off this slight stain from his character; and, although there were a few who, dissatisfied with their own fortunes, or conscious of their own demerits, would make dark hints concerning the sudden prosperity of the unportioned Quaker, yet his services, and possibly his wealth, soon drove the recollection of these vague conjectures from men’s minds.
Everything natural, probable, reasonable, was against it; all their habits and ways of thinking, and all her own demerits.
The old clergyman had slipped on a stone in mid-stream, and, as he dragged a dripping leg up the opposite bank, he had sworn an oath worthy of the "godless young man" who had put him to flight, and on whose demerits he had descanted with so much eloquence and indignation.
We find, among others in the accounts of the provost's office for 1466, a curious detail concerning the expenses of the trial of Gillet-Soulart and his sow, "executed for their demerits," at Corbeil.
This brought fresh tears into Madame Mantalini's eyes, which having just begun to open to some few of the demerits of Mr Mantalini, were only open a very little way, and could be easily closed again.