demise


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

de·mise

 (dĭ-mīz′)
n.
1.
a. Death.
b. The end of existence or activity; termination: the demise of the streetcar.
2. Law Transfer of an estate by lease or will.
3. The transfer of a ruler's authority by death or abdication.
v. de·mised, de·mis·ing, de·mis·es
v.tr.
1. Law To transfer (an estate) by will or lease.
2. To transfer (sovereignty) by abdication or will.
v.intr.
1. Law To be transferred by will or descent: The land demised to a charitable institution.
2. To die.

[Middle English, transfer of property, from Old French dimis, past participle of demettre, to release; see demit.]

de·mis′a·ble adj.

demise

(dɪˈmaɪz)
n
1. failure or termination: the demise of one's hopes.
2. a euphemistic or formal word for death
3. (Law) property law
a. a transfer of an estate by lease
b. the passing or transfer of an estate on the death of the owner
4. (Law) the immediate transfer of sovereignty to a successor upon the death, abdication, etc, of a ruler (esp in the phrase demise of the crown)
vb
5. (Law) to transfer or be transferred by inheritance, will, or succession
6. (Law) (tr) property law to transfer (an estate, etc) for a limited period; lease
7. (Law) (tr) to transfer (sovereignty, a title, etc) by or as if by the death, deposition, etc, of a ruler
[C16: from Old French, feminine of demis dismissed, from demettre to send away, from Latin dīmittere; see dismiss]
deˈmisable adj

de•mise

(dɪˈmaɪz)

n., v. -mised, -mis•ing. n.
1. death or decease.
2. termination of existence or operation.
3.
a. a death or decease occasioning the transfer of an estate.
b. a conveyance or transfer of an estate.
4. the transfer of sovereignty, as by the death or abdication of the sovereign.
v.t.
5. to transfer (an estate or the like) by bequest or lease.
6. to transfer (sovereignty), as by death or abdication.
v.i.
7. to pass by bequest or inheritance.
[1400–50; late Middle English dimis(s)e, demise < Old French demis (past participle of desmetre) < Latin dīmissum (past participle of dīmittere); see demit, dismiss]
de•mis`a•bil′i•ty, n.
de•mis′a•ble, adj.

demise


Past participle: demised
Gerund: demising

Imperative
demise
demise
Present
I demise
you demise
he/she/it demises
we demise
you demise
they demise
Preterite
I demised
you demised
he/she/it demised
we demised
you demised
they demised
Present Continuous
I am demising
you are demising
he/she/it is demising
we are demising
you are demising
they are demising
Present Perfect
I have demised
you have demised
he/she/it has demised
we have demised
you have demised
they have demised
Past Continuous
I was demising
you were demising
he/she/it was demising
we were demising
you were demising
they were demising
Past Perfect
I had demised
you had demised
he/she/it had demised
we had demised
you had demised
they had demised
Future
I will demise
you will demise
he/she/it will demise
we will demise
you will demise
they will demise
Future Perfect
I will have demised
you will have demised
he/she/it will have demised
we will have demised
you will have demised
they will have demised
Future Continuous
I will be demising
you will be demising
he/she/it will be demising
we will be demising
you will be demising
they will be demising
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been demising
you have been demising
he/she/it has been demising
we have been demising
you have been demising
they have been demising
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been demising
you will have been demising
he/she/it will have been demising
we will have been demising
you will have been demising
they will have been demising
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been demising
you had been demising
he/she/it had been demising
we had been demising
you had been demising
they had been demising
Conditional
I would demise
you would demise
he/she/it would demise
we would demise
you would demise
they would demise
Past Conditional
I would have demised
you would have demised
he/she/it would have demised
we would have demised
you would have demised
they would have demised
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.demise - the time when something endsdemise - the time when something ends; "it was the death of all his plans"; "a dying of old hopes"
lifespan, lifetime, life-time, life - the period during which something is functional (as between birth and death); "the battery had a short life"; "he lived a long and happy life"
grave - death of a person; "he went to his grave without forgiving me"; "from cradle to grave"
end, ending - the point in time at which something ends; "the end of the year"; "the ending of warranty period"
Verb1.demise - transfer by a lease or by a will
transfer - cause to change ownership; "I transferred my stock holdings to my children"

demise

noun
2. death (Euphemistic) end, dying, passing, departure, expiration, decease Smoking was the cause of his early demise.

demise

noun
The act or fact of dying:
Slang: curtain (used in plural).
verb
To cease living:
Informal: pop off.
Idioms: bite the dust, breathe one's last, cash in, give up the ghost, go to one's grave, kick the bucket, meet one's end, pass on to the Great Beyond, turn up one's toes.
Translations

demise

[dɪˈmaɪz] N (frm) (= death) → fallecimiento m (fig) [of institution etc] → desaparición f

demise

[dɪˈmaɪz] n
(= death) [person] → décès m
(= end) → mort f
the demise of → la mort de

demise

n (= death)Tod m; (of person also)Ableben nt (geh); (fig, of institution, newspaper etc) → Ende nt

demise

[dɪˈmaɪz] n (frm) → decesso
References in classic literature ?
The landlord and Sancho consented, and then Master Pedro picked up from the ground King Marsilio of Saragossa with his head off, and said, "Here you see how impossible it is to restore this king to his former state, so I think, saving your better judgments, that for his death, decease, and demise, four reals and a half may be given me.
Waving the women away, I informed them that Sola would attend the captive hereafter, and I further warned Sarkoja that any more of her cruel attentions bestowed upon Dejah Thoris would result in Sarkoja's sudden and painful demise.
And if I went instead of you and got spotted, which is so likely with this head of hair, and the general belief in my demise, the consequences to you would be too awful to contemplate
He kept on dreaming the same dream: a telegram was handed to him one morning, early, which announced the Vicar's sudden demise, and freedom was in his grasp.
The following morning, while the first worm is busily engaged in testing the construction of our coffin, they are teeing up for the first hole to suffer more acute sorrow over a sliced ball than they did over our, to us, untimely demise.
The morbid fears superinduced by the shock following the sudden demise of the first creature of his experiments had given place to a growing desire to further prosecute his labors until enduring success had crowned his efforts with an achievement which he might exhibit with pride to the scientific world.
That my demise would have been a relief to you I can, of course, easily believe, but the means--they surely were not worthy of your ingenuity.
Was not a bowl of wine the cause of the demise of Alexander the Great, or, at least, does not Dr.
Her deceased mother had established the business, and on that parent's demise she had appropriated a secret capital of fifteen shillings to establishing herself in it; the existence of such capital in a pillow being the last intelligible confidential communication made to her by the departed, before succumbing to dropsical conditions of snuff and gin, incompatible equally with coherence and existence.
Prosee, the eminent counsel, three solicitors, one commissioner of bankrupts, a special pleader from the Temple, a small-eyed peremptory young gentleman, his pupil, who had written a lively book about the law of demises, with a vast quantity of marginal notes and references; and several other eminent and distinguished personages.
In addition, the owner submitted an affidavit made by the grandson himself (in support of the grandson's motion to intervene in the proceeding) wherein the grandson admitted that he had neither relinquished his own apartment residence nor moved into the grandmother's apartment "on a permanent and full-time basis" until approximately one month prior to the tenant's demise.
EPA and Congress knew that ONAC's demise would precipitate this situation, says Elkins, now an assistant to EPA's General Counsel.