democratizer

democratizer

(dɪˈmɒkrəˌtaɪzə) or

democratiser

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person or thing that democratizes
References in periodicals archive ?
And third, that the idea of reparations threatens something much deeper--America's heritage, history, and standing in the world; white supremacy is not merely the work of hotheaded demagogues, or a matter of false consciousness, but a force so fundamental to America that it is difficult to imagine the country without it; reparations beckons us to reject the intoxication of hubris and see America as it is--the work of fallible humans; reparations would mean a revolution of the American consciousness, a reconciling of a self-image as the great democratizer with the facts of history.
Built upon its self-perception as the world's democratizer and enforcer of "international" norms, the United States considers itself a leader whose national interests usually correspond to global interests.
Deliberating and then paying reparations would constitute a "national reckoning that would lead to spiritual renewal," a "revolution of the American consciousness," and "a reconciling of our self-image as the great democratizer with the facts of our history.
It is the great democratizer, because anyone can afford a KFC meal; even top chefs can be found huddled in the neighborhood branch after dinner service.
The Internet is the worst nightmare of the Chinese leadership because it is the great democratizer of information," she said.
At some later point, a liberal democratic political theology characteristic of the Council rose and spread through its ranks and led it to become a democratizer.
I'm wondering if you can direct me to something that refutes, in a nutshell, the idea that public schooling is the "Great Democratizer.
Baseball was the great democratizer, a place where men earned their place on the team not because of rank, or social class, but because of skill," he said, gesturing to the starch white shirt hovering above them.
Concerning both function and availability of education, in modern universities, education is seen as the great democratizer, available to anyone regardless of social standing, due to scholarships, grants, student loans and such; whereas the medieval university, although not dominated by aristocrats until the fifteenth or sixteenth centuries, was not nevertheless open to the poor until the college movement provided room and board for poorer students, which began in the late twelfth century.
Bronner viewed Goode as a democratizer and promoter of museums, a progressive in the era of rising nativism and nationalism.
To his subjects, he was a man of many guises: liberal democratizer, monarch, descendant of the Prophet, secularist, shaykh of all tribal shaykhs, and a refuge for the Palestinian people.
The Internet will become a great equalizer and democratizer for a mass media marketplace that has been dominated in the past by middlemen -- agents, editors, publishers, book sellers, reviewers, etc.