demure


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Related to demure: modest

de·mure

 (dĭ-myo͝or′)
adj. de·mur·er, de·mur·est
1. Modest and reserved in manner or behavior.
2. Characterized by or suggestive of reserve or modesty: a demure smile; a demure outfit.

[Middle English, probably from Anglo-Norman (influenced by Old French mur, meur, mature, serious), past participle of demurer, to delay, wait; see demur.]

de·mure′ly adv.
de·mure′ness n.

demure

(dɪˈmjʊə)
adj
1. sedate; decorous; reserved
2. affectedly modest or prim; coy
[C14: perhaps from Old French demorer to delay, linger; perhaps influenced by meur ripe, mature]
deˈmurely adv
deˈmureness n

de•mure

(dɪˈmyʊər)

adj. -mur•er, -mur•est.
1. characterized by shyness and modesty; reserved.
2. affectedly or coyly decorous or sedate.
[1350–1400; Middle English dem(e)ur(e) well-mannered, grave]
de•mure′ly, adv.
de•mure′ness, n.
syn: See modest.
demur, demure - Demur is the verb "to object or voice opposition," while demure is the adjective meaning "modest, shy."
See also related terms for shy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Switch to new thesaurus
Adj.1.demure - affectedly modest or shy especially in a playful or provocative way
modest - not offensive to sexual mores in conduct or appearance

demure

adjective
1. shy (usually used of a young woman) reserved, modest, retiring, reticent, unassuming, diffident, decorous She's very demure and sweet.
shy forward, brash, brazen, shameless, impudent, immodest
2. coy, prim, bashful, prudish, prissy (informal), strait-laced, affected, priggish, niminy-piminy a demure frumpy middle-aged librarian

demure

adjective
Not forward but reticent or reserved in manner:
Translations

demure

[dɪˈmjʊəʳ] ADJ [person] (= modest) → recatado; (= coy) → tímido y algo coqueto; [clothing, appearance] → recatado
in a demure little voiceen tono dulce y algo coqueta

demure

[dɪˈmjʊər] adj
(= quiet and shy) [girl] → discret/ète
[clothes] → sobre

demure

adj (+er)sittsam

demure

[dɪˈmjʊəʳ] adj (girl) → pieno/a di contegno; (smile) → contegnoso/a

demure

(diˈmjuə) adjective
quiet, shy, modest and well behaved (sometimes deceptively). She looked too demure ever to do such a bold thing.
deˈmurely adverb
deˈmureness noun
References in classic literature ?
Each and all were answered by a smile, a bow, and a demure "Yes" or "No" with the chill on.
She looked demure and pretty, and made a graceful picture in her blue cashmere dress and little blue hat, with a plaid shawl drawn neatly about her shoulders and a clumsy pocket-book in her hand.
Again, another reminded her of children at play, and still another of nothing on earth but a demure lady stroking a cat.
He saw a short word prepared for Emma, and given to her with a look sly and demure.
Lucy, with a demure and settled air, seemed determined to make no contribution to the comfort of the others, and would not say a word; and almost every thing that WAS said, proceeded from Elinor, who was obliged to volunteer all the information about her mother's health, their coming to town, &c.
With what a demure assumption of being immensely older and wiser than I, the fairy little woman said I was 'a silly boy'; and then laughed so charmingly that I forgot the pain of being called by that disparaging name, in the pleasure of looking at her.
The black dresses, bare scalps, and demure looks of these church-men, formed a strong contrast to the warlike appearance of the knights who attended, either as residing in the Preceptory, or as come thither to attend upon their Grand Master.
one day the demure Marcela makes her appearance turned shepherdess; and, in spite of her uncle and all those of the town that strove to dissuade her, took to going a-field with the other shepherd-lasses of the village, and tending her own flock.
She had that deliberate, demure little air which distinguishes young women who have married for love.
A certain light-haired girl had made vivacious fun at his martial spirit, but there was another and darker girl whom he had gazed at steadfastly, and he thought she grew demure and sad at sight of his blue and brass.
He had made up his mind to see her advance with a measured step and a demure solemnity of countenance; he had felt sure that her face would be mantled with the smile of conscious saintship, or else charged with denunciatory bitterness.
Francois," said she, "you are jealous," and still she laughed; then, as if suddenly recollecting that this coquetry was not consistent with the character for modest dignity she wished to establish, she proceeded, in a demure voice: "Truly, my dear Francois, I will not deny that this young Englishman may have made some attempts to ingratiate himself with me; but, so far from giving him any encouragement, I have always treated him with as much reserve as it was possible to combine with civility; affianced as I am to you, I would give no man false hopes; believe me, dear friend.