denaturalize

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de·nat·u·ral·ize

 (dē-năch′ər-ə-līz′)
tr.v. de·nat·u·ral·ized, de·nat·u·ral·iz·ing, de·nat·u·ral·iz·es
1. To make unnatural.
2. To deprive of the rights of citizenship.

de·nat′u·ral·i·za′tion (-ər-ə-lĭ-zā′shən) n.

denaturalize

(diːˈnætʃrəˌlaɪz) or

denaturalise

vb (tr)
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to deprive of nationality
2. to make unnatural
deˌnaturaliˈzation, deˌnaturaliˈsation n

de•nat•u•ral•ize

(diˈnætʃ ər əˌlaɪz)

v.t. -ized, -iz•ing.
1. to deprive of proper or true nature; make unnatural.
2. to deprive of the rights and privileges of citizenship or of naturalization.
[1790–1800]
de•nat`u•ral•i•za′tion, n.

denaturalize


Past participle: denaturalized
Gerund: denaturalizing

Imperative
denaturalize
denaturalize
Present
I denaturalize
you denaturalize
he/she/it denaturalizes
we denaturalize
you denaturalize
they denaturalize
Preterite
I denaturalized
you denaturalized
he/she/it denaturalized
we denaturalized
you denaturalized
they denaturalized
Present Continuous
I am denaturalizing
you are denaturalizing
he/she/it is denaturalizing
we are denaturalizing
you are denaturalizing
they are denaturalizing
Present Perfect
I have denaturalized
you have denaturalized
he/she/it has denaturalized
we have denaturalized
you have denaturalized
they have denaturalized
Past Continuous
I was denaturalizing
you were denaturalizing
he/she/it was denaturalizing
we were denaturalizing
you were denaturalizing
they were denaturalizing
Past Perfect
I had denaturalized
you had denaturalized
he/she/it had denaturalized
we had denaturalized
you had denaturalized
they had denaturalized
Future
I will denaturalize
you will denaturalize
he/she/it will denaturalize
we will denaturalize
you will denaturalize
they will denaturalize
Future Perfect
I will have denaturalized
you will have denaturalized
he/she/it will have denaturalized
we will have denaturalized
you will have denaturalized
they will have denaturalized
Future Continuous
I will be denaturalizing
you will be denaturalizing
he/she/it will be denaturalizing
we will be denaturalizing
you will be denaturalizing
they will be denaturalizing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been denaturalizing
you have been denaturalizing
he/she/it has been denaturalizing
we have been denaturalizing
you have been denaturalizing
they have been denaturalizing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been denaturalizing
you will have been denaturalizing
he/she/it will have been denaturalizing
we will have been denaturalizing
you will have been denaturalizing
they will have been denaturalizing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been denaturalizing
you had been denaturalizing
he/she/it had been denaturalizing
we had been denaturalizing
you had been denaturalizing
they had been denaturalizing
Conditional
I would denaturalize
you would denaturalize
he/she/it would denaturalize
we would denaturalize
you would denaturalize
they would denaturalize
Past Conditional
I would have denaturalized
you would have denaturalized
he/she/it would have denaturalized
we would have denaturalized
you would have denaturalized
they would have denaturalized
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.denaturalize - make less natural or unnatural
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
naturalise, naturalize - make more natural or lifelike
2.denaturalize - strip of the rights and duties of citizenship; "The former Nazi was denaturalized"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
naturalize, naturalise - make into a citizen; "The French family was naturalized last year"
References in periodicals archive ?
Ein wamS After the war, he emigrated to the US and became a citizen in 1963, but was denaturalised in 2002.
The recognition that family care was a policy concern (rather than an entirely private matter) politicised or denaturalised it (Williams 2010: 3), yet the restriction of the payment to co-resident relatives reinforced caring as a familial responsibility (see Daly 2001: 50; Leitner 2003).
As was the case in some intersectionality research analysed above, the limitations of existing queer methodologies seem to relate to a tendency to reestablish norms where categories have initially been denaturalised.