dendrochronology

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den·dro·chro·nol·o·gy

 (dĕn′drō-krə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The study of climate changes and past events by comparing the successive annual growth rings of trees or old timber.

den′dro·chron′o·log′i·cal (-krŏn′ə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
den′dro·chron′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
den′dro·chro·nol′o·gist n.

dendrochronology

(ˌdɛndrəʊkrəˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Forestry) the study of the annual rings of trees, used esp to date past events
dendrochronological adj
ˌdendrochroˈnologist n

den•dro•chro•nol•o•gy

(ˌdɛn droʊ krəˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
the study of the annual rings of trees to determine the dates and chronology of past events.
[1925–30]
den`dro•chron`o•log′i•cal (-ˌkrɒn lˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
den`dro•chron`o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
den`dro•chro•nol′o•gist, n.

den·dro·chro·nol·o·gy

(dĕn′drō-krə-nŏl′ə-jē)
The study of annual rings in trees in order to analyze past climate conditions or to determine the date of past events. Trees grow more slowly in periods of drought or other environmental stress than they do under more favorable conditions, and thus the annual rings they produce are smaller. By observing the pattern formed by a tree's rings, scientists can learn about the environmental changes that took place during the period in which it was growing. They can also match up the pattern in trees whose age is known to the pattern in a piece of wood found at an archaeological site, thereby establishing the approximate date of the site.

dendrochronology

the science of fixing dates in the past by the study of growth rings in trees. — dendrochronologist, n.dendrochronological, adj.
See also: Time
the study of annual rings in trees to determine their age, climatic and other conditions and changes that might have affected them, etc. — dendrochronologist, n.dendrochronological, adj.
See also: Trees

dendrochronology

The study of the annual rings of trees and the use of these in dating past events.
Translations
Dendrochronologie

dendrochronology

[ˌdendrəʊkrəˈnɒlədʒɪ] Ndendrocronología f
References in periodicals archive ?
It is quite remarkable that this large, complex and impressive organism has survived so long in such an inhospitable environment, in a land that has been civilized for over 3,000 years," Swedish dendrochronologist and leader of the expedition, Paul J.
Climate change is the main topic of this year's BGT: During the first scientific presentation, in January at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherry Earth Observatory, students toured the labs of a paleobotanist and cored a tree with a dendrochronologist.
Dendrochronologist Mike Baillie found physical evidence of the event studying the tree rings of Irish oak (Baillie 1994).
The widths of trees' annual growth rings reveal what the climate was like in the years they formed, said Anchukaitis, who joined WHOI in September as its first dendrochronologist, or tree-ring specialist.
A dendrochronologist must be able to read micro-rings just two cells wide, false rings embedded in a single annual ring, fuzzy ring boundaries in tropical trees, missing rings, pinched rings that are missing part of their circumference, frost rings formed from freezing temperatures during the growing season, and fire scars that lack telltale charcoal.
How would a dendrochronologist estimate the age of a timber-framed building?
Jacoby, a dendrochronologist at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University in Palisades, N.
The identification came from a dendrochronologist, Edmund Schulman.
The theory was apparently disproven recently when an dendrochronologist determined the tree predates Lewis and Clark, lending credence to the other theory: it was planted by Native Americans who valued the flexible wood for its value as hunting bows.
Cook, a dendrochronologist with Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory in Palisades, N.
Editor: The jury is still out on the age of the great osage-orange at the home of Patrick Henry, despite the intriguing article (Summer 2003) by Nancy Ross Hugo and the two increment cores taken by dendrochronologist Carolyn Copenheaver.