dendroglyph


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dendroglyph

(ˈdɛndrəʊˌɡlɪf)
n
the art of carving in the bark of a living tree, esp as practised by the aboriginal peoples of New Zealand
References in periodicals archive ?
Arborglyphs, dendroglyphs and silvaglyphs are otherwise known as tree writing, in which words or pictures are carved into the bark of trees.
The designs invariably take the form of paired sets of figurative and geometric elements: at the apex, a map of the continent with Victorian and Australian flags or the Australian coat of arms; in the centre of each blade, pairs of birds perched on a leafy twig signifying either the Mullett family totem of the Laughing Kookaburra or the Gippsland moieties; the male moiety Yeerung, the southern Emu Wren, and the female moiety Djeegun, the Superb Fairy Wren and, at the tip of the blade, geometric designs, individual to each artist, similar to those formerly used in carved wooden artifacts, dendroglyphs and possum skin cloaks traditional to the south east.
Aspen carvings, also known as dendroglyphs, arborglyphs, and aspen art, are an important record of an areas historic past," says Joann Blalack, cultural resources manager at Great Basin.
Regionally specific artefact types such as dendroglyphs (carved trees) from New South Wales were implied, by virtue of their inclusion, to occur throughout the country.