denigratory


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Related to denigratory: libelous, slandering
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.denigratory - (used of statements) harmful and often untrue; tending to discredit or malign
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"
Translations

denigratory

[ˌdenɪˈgreɪtərɪ] ADJdenigratorio

denigratory

[ˈdɛnɪˌgreɪtrɪ] adjdenigratorio/a
References in periodicals archive ?
The committee agreed that the offensive, denigratory and discriminatory actions of a group of Ukrainian supporters were shameful and a clear breach of the FIFA Disciplinary Code (FDC).
On the Bulgarian fans, Fifa said "the offensive, denigratory and discriminatory actions of a small group of Bulgarian supporters was shameful and a clear breach of the Fifa disciplinary code".
Something more of the denigratory force of 'caricatured' can be inferred from a paraphrase of 'caricature' given by Dick in a different context, of Biblical interpretation: 'to twist it from its precise and sublime references, to accord with the vague fancies of injudicious minds'.
8) As Shovlin notes, the absence of any reference, however denigratory, demonstrates 'that this younger generation of writers does not seem to have even considered Seumas O'Sullivan's The Dublin Magazine as an option for publication'.
Last night Mr Browne, below, said: "My point was and is that part of the masculine culture here is the use of language that is hugely denigratory of women and that the language of the gardai at Rossport is illustrative of that, although with an additional and sinister menace.
Stella McCartney Ltd complained that the ad was denigratory and took unfair advantage of the brand because it associated it with a personal hygiene product without permission.
The more truthful the information, the less likely is splitting between an idealised version of birth parents and a denigratory portrayal of adopters.
Foreignness can be inside or outside of the nation, objective or subjective, a dimension of the adversary or of the self, a denigratory or accepting designation, fantasized or real, conscious or unconscious, an idea staged on the boards or merely conceived in the eye of the beholder.
Postlewait surveys both celebratory and denigratory views of Edwardes and musical comedy and, following Peter Bailey, argues that as much as avant-garde drama, 'the popular theatre, on and off stage, was becoming a new kind of social process for articulating the texture and conditions of urban life' (p.
The Bingo Association complained the ad was misleading and denigratory because it implied that bingo clubs generally were closed and that it was a "dying" industry.