denouement


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de·noue·ment

also dé·noue·ment  (dā′no͞o-mäN′)
n.
1.
a. The final resolution or clarification of a dramatic or narrative plot.
b. The events following the climax of a drama or novel in which such a resolution or clarification takes place.
2. The outcome of a sequence of events; the end result.

[French dénouement, from Old French desnouement, an untying, from desnouer, to undo : des-, de- + nouer, to tie (from Latin nōdāre, from nōdus, knot; see ned- in Indo-European roots).]

denouement

(deɪˈnuːmɒn) or

dénouement

n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms)
a. the final clarification or resolution of a plot in a play or other work
b. the point at which this occurs
2. final outcome; solution
[C18: from French, literally: an untying, from dénouer to untie, from Old French desnoer, from des- de- + noer to tie, knot, from Latin nōdāre, from nōdus a knot; see node]

de•noue•ment

or dé•noue•ment

(ˌdeɪ nuˈmɑ̃)

n.
1. the final resolution of a plot, as of a drama or novel.
2. the outcome or resolution of a doubtful series of occurrences.
[1745–55; < French: literally, an untying]

denouement

the final resolution of the plot, following the climax.
See also: Drama
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.denouement - the outcome of a complex sequence of events
final result, outcome, resultant, termination, result - something that results; "he listened for the results on the radio"
2.denouement - the final resolution of the main complication of a literary or dramatic work
answer, result, solution, solvent, resolution - a statement that solves a problem or explains how to solve the problem; "they were trying to find a peaceful solution"; "the answers were in the back of the book"; "he computed the result to four decimal places"

denouement

dénouement
noun
1. climax, conclusion, finale, termination, culmination the book's sentimental denouement
2. outcome, end, result, consequence, resolution, conclusion, end result, upshot an unexpected denouement to the affair
Translations

denouement

dénouement [deɪˈnuːmɒn] Ndesenlace m

denouement

dénouement [deɪˈnuːmɒn] n [book, play, series events] → dénouement m

dénouement

n (Theat, Liter) → (Auf)lösung f; (fig)Ausgang m

denouement

dénouement [deɪˈnuːmɒn] nepilogo
References in classic literature ?
Her story was as full of desperation and despair as her limited acquaintance with those uncomfortable emotions enabled her to make it, and having located it in Lisbon, she wound up with an earthquake, as a striking and appropriate denouement.
Every tragedy falls into two parts,--Complication and Unravelling or Denouement.
D'Artagnan, whose mind was never more fertile in resources than in critical emergencies, swore again that he would try all conceivable means to prevent the denouement of the bloody tragedy.
Nevertheless, one or two of the most excellent women I have ever known, have been French governesses, though I do not choose to reveal what this particular individual of the class turned out to be in the end, until the moment for the denouement of her character shall regularly arrive.
Had not my mind been so full of Polina, I should have given myself up to the comical piquancy of the impending denouement, and laughed my fill at it.
But with the denouement of the scene he threw off all restraint, and laughed aloud.
He was not sorry for the denouement of his visit: he only wished it had come sooner, and spared him a certain waste of emotion.
Several other passengers had drawn toward the scene of the altercation, and all awaited the denouement.
My paper was an early edition," Bransome answered, "but it spoke of a sensational denouement within the next few hours.
All about the carriage were gathered the children from a dozen blocks, waiting and eager for some tragic and terrible denouement.
While suspicion was to be directed against him, she would be making quiet preparations for a very different denouement.
It was given to me by the Registrar himself, some time after the astonishing denouement to this case, and is unique in judicial chronicles.