biofilm

(redirected from dental biofilm)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

bi·o·film

 (bī′ō-fĭlm′)
n.
A complex structure adhering to surfaces that are regularly in contact with water, consisting of colonies of bacteria that secrete a mucilaginous protective coating in which they are encased. Biofilms, which are resistant to antibiotics and disinfectants, corrode pipes and cause diseases such as lung infections, but they can be used beneficially to treat sewage, industrial waste, and contaminated soil.

biofilm

(ˈbaɪəʊˌfɪlm)
n
(Microbiology) a thin layer of living organisms
Translations
biofilm
References in periodicals archive ?
3) Increased dental biofilm may result in periodontal changes and the development of periodontitis over time.
Dental biofilm and free-flowing planktonic bacteria were established as the cause of periodontal infection; the infection could be treated effectively with the ultrasonic unit set on low power to remove bacteria and calculus.
tenax in the dental biofilm there are only few reports on their role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.
REAL-TIME QUANTITATIVE POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (QPCR) FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF STREPTOCOCCUS MUTANS IN SALIVA AND DENTAL BIOFILM IN CHILDREN
In situ effects of restorative materials on dental biofilm and enamel demineralisation," Journal of Dentistry, vol.
The authors concluded that the addition of natural antimicrobial agents to dentifrices can act as an adjuvant in the mechanical control of the dental biofilm.
In fact, toothbrushing compliance is reduced under the use of an abrasive-free formula, due to the poor cleaning capacity of the toothbrush alone in removing pellicle, resulting in increased tooth staining and rapid dental biofilm regrowth.
To have a beneficial effect in limiting or preventing dental caries, a probiotic must be able to adhere to dental surfaces and integrate into the bacterial communities making up the dental biofilm.
They should be guided in the elimination and/or reduction of dental biofilm and health promotion.
Effect of sucrose concentration on dental biofilm formed in situ and on enamel demineralization.
The periodontium responds to the aggression of the bacterial dental biofilm through inflammation, the moment of evolution and of inflammatory extension in the periodontium support tissues, marking the transformation of the gingivitis and superficial chronically marginal periodontitis into deep chronically marginal periodontitis.
Price and the efficacy of the polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) tape for the removal of the proximal dental biofilm compared to the common nylon dental floss in adolescents and young adults