denunciatory


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Related to denunciatory: ne'er

de·nun·ci·a·tion

 (dĭ-nŭn′sē-ā′shən, -shē-)
n.
1. The act or an instance of denouncing, especially a public condemnation or censure.
2. The reporting of a person to the authorities for possible criminal prosecution.

[Middle English denunciacioun, from Latin dēnūntiātiō, dēnūntiātiōn-, from dēnūntiātus, past participle of dēnūntiāre, to announce; see denounce.]

de·nun′ci·a′tive (-ā′tĭv, -ə-tĭv), de·nun′ci·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.

de•nun•ci•a•to•ry

(dɪˈnʌn si əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i, -ʃi-)

also de•nun•ci•a•tive

(-ˌeɪ tɪv, -ə tɪv)

adj.
characterized by or given to denunciation.
[1720–30]
de•nun′ci•a`tive•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.denunciatory - containing warning of punishment
inculpative, inculpatory - causing blame to be imputed to

denunciatory

adjective
Containing, relating to, or involving an accusation:
Translations
denunziatorisch
References in classic literature ?
Certainly neither I nor Fernand," said Danglars, rising and looking at the young man, who still remained seated, but whose eye was fixed on the denunciatory sheet of paper flung into the corner.
He was steadying himself on my shoulder with a strong grip, while his other arm, flung up rigidly, pointed a denunciatory finger at the immense tranquillity of the ocean.
Hale's rejoinder, when I had read the item aloud; but the incident evidently weighed upon his mind, for late in the afternoon, with many epithets denunciatory of his foolishness, he asked me to acquaint the police with the affair.
He had made up his mind to see her advance with a measured step and a demure solemnity of countenance; he had felt sure that her face would be mantled with the smile of conscious saintship, or else charged with denunciatory bitterness.
The Bard' is the imagined denunciatory utterance of a Welsh bard, the sole survivor from the slaughter of the bards made by Edward I of England on his conquest of Wales.
He pressed a denunciatory finger to his breast with force, and became perfectly still.
Unlike John Adams, who enjoyed aggressive argument whether he was furiously scribbling notes in his diaries, dashing off denunciatory marginalia in his books, or writing pugnacious letters to his friends, Jefferson always had a certain reserve that avoided confrontation, preferring to take things by `the smooth handle', a quality that was reciprocated by Madison.
Silber and Little point no denunciatory fingers, but the cumulative impact of their reporting and analysis, based on extraordinary access to the key players in the former Communist governments of the Yugoslav republics, internal military intelligence videotapes, and other previously unearthed primary sources, is that Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia is the principal culprit in the Yugoslav crack-up.
The denunciatory tone is relieved at the end by a long hymn to the Virgin.
Bhaggiyadatta's scatter-gun satire speaks for every anti-white, anticapitalist, anti-imperialist cause: a denunciatory voice, he concedes nothing to "them," the other.
The denunciatory theory of punishment is about societal condemnation of wrong-doing.
It is a response to the deterritorialization suffered by the old 19th century dramatic candombes, and goes beyond the denunciatory and confrontational ruptures of nueva cancion (Reyes 449-50).